5 Emblematic City Landmarks

Obelisco: This Buenos Aires icon at the center of the emblematic 9 de Julio avenue in the heart of the city is a well-known city landmark. It has been standing since 1936 and was built to celebrate the foundation of the city.  The obelisk has since functioned as a meeting point to celebrate world-cup football wins, and to stage shows such as Julio Bocca’s last dance and a Placido Domingo live concert, amongst others. It is also often decorated to commemorate many occasions, such as the Bicentennial or the memorable 2005 world Aids day – in which it was covered by a giant condom!

(Photo by slaff)

Torre Monumental: The Palladian-style tower in front of Retiro train station was a gift to the city from the British to commemorate the centennial of the May Revolution. Initially, its name was Torre de los Ingleses, but the name was changed after the Falklands/Malvinas war.  Still, it stands as one of the city’s signature monuments, displaying the Irish shamrock, the Welsh dragon, the Scottish thistle and the English rose.

(Photo by morrissey)

Monumento de los Españoles: This stunning monument on Sarmiento and Libertador avenues in Palermo was donated in 1910 by the local Spanish community to commemorate the May revolution, although due to many complications in its construction it wasn’t inaugurated until 1927. The bronze and marble monument, which is also called “La Magna Carta y las Cuatro Regiones Argentinas,” consists of a  representation of the Pampas, the Andes, Chaco and Rio de La Plata regions on its base, and at the top of the monument, a statue of the Republic.

(Photo by InnerCore)

Puente de la Mujer: This beautiful modern bridge in Puerto Madero was designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava and was inspired by tango dancers. Its unique  and elegant design, which includes a complex rotational system to allow boats through, has made it famous worldwide.

(Photo by Christian Haugen)

Floralis Generica: Argentine architect Eduardo Catalano is responsible for the impressive steel and aluminum flower the heart of Recoleta. The sculpture, which closes its metal petals at night and reopens with the sunlight, is symbolic for rebirth and hope.

(Photo by matt.hintsa)

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