Argentine Art: 1950’s to Present Day

After the first vanguards in the early 20th century, the art scene in Argentina flourished. There were, and are, many different trends and themes, groups, and art movements. Buenos Aires is filled with galleries and museums and the scene is thriving with abundant quality local production and a large local and international public/market for it. Due to the wide variety of styles and movements it is difficult to trace a specific line in Argentine contemporary art which is why we have selected just a few of the recent emblematic artists from the local scene.

The abstract international Madí movement was spurred by by Gyula Kosice and Carmelo Arden Quin. It suggested that art should be liberated so that creation and invention could take place without the restraints of format, style and preconceived notions of what art should be.

(Persistence of the Mobile Drop of Water, Gyula Kosice. Photo by mirsasha)

The Kinetic art movement was the successor to the Madí movement with renowned artist Julio Le Parc at its head.  This movement, which played with the ideas of motion and light, sought to engage the spectator with the piece making it truly dynamic.

(Continuel Movil. Julio Le Parc. Photo by Tecnópolis Argentina)

Antonio Seguí is a painter, sculptor and illustrator. His work over the years has been versatile and influences range from expressionism, to surrealism to hyperrealism. The works, which include sculptures, paintings, illustrations and more, often deal with social themes presented in a satirical angle.

(Antonio Seguí. Photo by blacques_jacques)

Marta Minujín is one of the most talked about Argentine artists. She is a conceptual/pop artist who has carried out many “Happenings” both in Buenos Aires and abroad since the 60’s. Her work, which includes sculptures, paintings and more, is centered on consumer culture and on the ephemeral.

(Colchones de Marta. Marta Minujín. Photo by Richard Bolivar)

Leon Ferrari’s controversial conceptual art questions western religion and power relationships in a provocative way. His works, which include collages, sculptures and the use of resignification, have earned him  international fame and reputation.

(León Ferrari. Photo by silvia_c77)

Read more about Argentine Art:

Argentine Pre Hispanic and Colonial Art

Nineteenth Century Argentine Art

Early 20th Century Argentine Art

Art Museums in Buenos Aires

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