Fileteado Porteño at Museo de la Ciudad

(Photo by mccopa)

The Museo de la Ciudad showcases all kinds of different aspects of Buenos Aires including permanent exhibits of city doors, toys, musical instruments, advertisements and more. Last Saturday it added a new permanent collection that features a typical porteño style of painting called Fileteado Porteño.

This typical Argentine painting style dates back to the nineteenth century when it was first used as a decoration for horse drawn carts used to transport foods. It was progressively developed as a way of advertising and because big letters were taxed, the focus was placed on elaborate ornamentation to frame smaller letters. The style also became popular amongst the tango scene and many traditional tango neighborhoods feature ornamented filetes on their walls.  It has since been used as a decoration for accordions, buses, furniture, home fronts and more. A visit to the museum is a great way to learn more about this colorful painting style, as is the Fileteado Porteño Tour. The museum is also showcasing a temporary exhibit on hats.

Museum opening hours are from Monday to Friday from 11am-7pm and on weekends from 1pm to 6pm. Tickets cost 1 peso. Defensa 219, San Telmo. 4331-9855

This Week in Buenos Aires

Monday

(Photo by J)

One of the architectural landmarks of the city is the famous Palacio Barolo. Construction of this regal building full of references to poet Dante Alighieri began in 1919 for what was to be the tallest structure in Latin America. Guided tours are available Mondays and Thursdays from 4pm to 7pm and evening guided tours on Mondays and Wednesdays at 8pm and Thursdays at 8.30pm includes tasting of an awarded wine and a national delicacy.

In the evening the talented flamenco dancer, Rafaela Carrasco, will be putting on a show at  Parque Centenario at 8pm.

 

Palacio Barolo

Av de Mayo 1370 9° P. Esc. 249/52

Tel/Fax: (54-11) 4381-1885

info@palaciobarolotours.com.ar

barolotours@gmail.com

 

Parque Centenario

Avenida Díaz Vélez 5463

4982 4252

 

Tuesday

(Photo by Quimbaya)

An exhibition on the storefront windows of the historic La Estrella pharmacy is being displayed at the Museo de la Ciudad.

In the evening head to traditional cafe Los 36 Billares for a live tango show with dancing staring at 9pm.

 

Museo de la Ciudad

Defensa 223, San Telmo

4331-9855

Open: Mon-Fri 11am-7pm, Sat-Sun 10am-8pm

 

Los 36 Billares

Av. De Mayo 1265, Downtown

4381-5696

 

Wednesday

(Photo by Valerie Everett)

A special exhibit of clothing and accessories related to weddings and family from 1870-1915  is being showcased at the Museo de Arte Hispano Americano Isaac Fernandez Blanco.

In the evening head to 878 bar in Palermo where renowned cocktail artist Tato Giovannoni will be preparing drinks thought the week.

 

Museo de Arte Hispano Americano

Suipacha 1422, Downtown

4327- 0228

 

878

Thames 878, Palermo

4773-1098

 

Thursday

(Photo by blmurch)

Explore the Tres de Febrero parks in Palermo. Between Av. Libertador and Lugones, and extending from Av. Casares in Palermo to La Pampa in Belgrano, this group of parks is composed of 25ha made up of 15 public parks and 21 private sport clubs and includes the “Rosedal”, an extensive rose garden, the Sivory Museum, the planetarium and the Japanese gardens.

Later on Book your place for the Fierro Hotel’s Thursday wine tasting and sample some great Argentine wines, chosen by the president of the Argentine sommelier association Andres Rosberg and in-house Sommelier Martin Bruno.  Tastings cost 25 USD per person and are limited to 7 people.

 

Fierro Hotel Buenos Aires

Soler 5862, Palermo

3220-6800

 

Friday

(Photo by capitu)

Experiment with your senses at the Centro Cultural Konex where the temporary exhibit “Dialogo en la Oscuridad” will guide you through a series of recreated situations, such as shopping or traveling in a boat,  in total darkness. The exhibit is held from 3pm-5.30pm

Afterwards stop for 5 o’clock tea at the stunning Las Violetas teahouse, which is just a few blocks away.

Also in the area is La Catedral where you can take an informal tango lesson at 7.30pm or at 9pm.

 

Centro Cultural Konex

Sarmiento 3131, Abasto.

4864-3200

 

Las Violetas

Av. Rivadavia 3899, Abasto.

4958-7387

 

La Catedral

Sarmiento 4006, doorbell 5, Almagro

Telephone: 4342-4794

 

Saturday and Sunday

(Photo by CateIncBA)

Check out one of the documentaries at DocBsAs, the annual documentary festival.  Program available here.

Sunday won’t offer much in terms of activities as it is Election Day, so it is a good chance to walk around the city to see architectural landmarks such as the Puente de la Mujer and the Cavannagh building. Restaurants will be open although alcohol will not be served on Saturday evening or Sunday.

 

10 Neighborhoods to Explore in Buenos Aires

1 Retiro: Full of movement and busy commuters going to and fro the central train station and bus terminals, this lively neighborhood is great for people watching and has wonderful sites too. The San Martin Park with its Malvinas monument, the Torre Monumental, The Kavanagh Building, the stunning Military Palace with its museum of arms, the Fernandez Blanco Hispanic art museum and the art galleries around calle Arroyo, make Retiro a great place to visit.

(Retiro train station by carlosoliveirareis)

2 San Nicolas: Next to Retiro, often know as downtown, this emblematic neighborhood is known for its many notable bars such as La Giralda and Confiteria Ideal, for the famous Obelisco and Corrientes Avenue where you can find Broadway like theatres, bookstores galore and the best pizzerias in town, and for its architectural landmarks such as Tribunales, the Palacio de Aguas Corrientes, and the stunning Colon Theatre.

(9 de Julio Avenue by puroticorico)

3 Puerto Madero: On the other side of San Nicolas, crossing the Leando Alem Avenue is Puerto Madero. This area, which is pierced by the river, is lined with renovated warehouses which were turned into hip restaurants. Modern and upscale, it is a great place to walk through, and lunch in. The elegant Puente de la Mujer, the Fragata de Libertad (a ship turned into a museum) and the Ecological Reserve through which you can get one of the best views of the city, are worth checking out whilst in the area.

(Puerto Madero by matt.hintsa)

4 La Boca: A well-known neighborhood in the turistic circuit because of its colorful houses and its historic relevance in the unique migratory patterns that defined the city’s identity in the early 20th century. Places worth checking out are Caminito, fundacion PROA (great art exhibits), the Quinquela Martin museum and the Boca stadium.

(La Boca by Paula Soler-Moya)

5 Barracas: This historic off the beaten path neighborhood was originally occupied by the emblematic families of the city who built beautiful palaces, houses and churches. An outbreak of yellow fever however scared these families out of their homes at the end of the 19th century and working class later populated it. A textile factory, and a chocolate factory amongst other were opened attracting more workers. These factories however closed in the eighties, and the construction of nearby highways impoverished the once rich neighborhood even more. This coexistence of classes and structures with interesting places such as churches, factories, pasaje lanin, and an underground meeting spot for secret societies make Barracas a very interesting place to visit. We do insist that you go with someone who knows the area as there are parts of the neighborhood that are very unsafe. Eternautas, for example offers a great tour of this area.

(Pasaje Lanin by jafsegal)

6 San Telmo: Another favorite on the turistic circuit, San Telmo is a colorful and lively neighborhood known for its antique fair on Sundays. Apart from its antique shops, it has many lovely traditional bars (El Federal, Bar Seddon, Bar Dorrego), a buzzing modern art and design scene (check out the MAMBA museum) and a lot of tango shows both on and off the streets.

(San Telmo antique fair by Paula Soler-Moya)

7 Monserrat: The historical and “political” neighborhood of Buenos Aires. Monserrat is where Congress and the government house (Casa Rosada) are set. Also in the area is Plaza de Mayo, Palacio Barolo, the subway line, which still keeps the charming old-fashioned wagons, Cafe Tortoni and Los 36 Billares and La Manzana de las Luces, an old jesuit residence dating back to the 1700’s.

(Cabildo by loco085)

8 Abasto and Almagro: (They’re really two neighborhoods but since they’re next to each other and have so much in common we decided to join them.) These buzzing cultural neighborhoods are considered to be tango epicenters as none other than Carlos Gardel was raised there. Consequently, the Carlos Gardel museum is in this neighborhood, as well as many tango bars and milongas such as La Catedral and El Bar de Roberto. Other places to visit are Confiteria Las Violetas, one of the most beautiful teahouses in the city, and the Centro Cultural Konex where original and lively shows are often staged.

(Pasaje Zelaya by mccopa)

9 Recoleta: the rich families of the city populated this luxurious emblematic neighborhood when they fled from Barracas due to the yellow fever outbreak. The lush parks and elaborate French architecture come to mind when Buenos Aires is referred to as the Paris of South America. The famous Recoleta cemetery is a must visit in the area, as well as the two art museums (MALBA and MNBA), the Duhau Palace, the Floralis Generica sculpture next to the national school of law and La Biela cafe.

(Floralis Generica by Evelyn Proimos)

10 Palermo: This extensive neighborhood has become the it place for dining, shopping and going out. Its lovely corners, gourmet restaurants, boutique hotels, unique design stores make it fun and lively. Its gorgeous 3 de Febrero parks with its rose garden, Japanese garden, Botanical garden and Zoo, and the racetracks complete this bustling areas appeal.

(Rosedal by claudioruiz)