3 Off the Beaten Path Parks in Buenos Aires

One of the great things about Buenos Aires is that despite being a big city, it’s got plenty a park and trees. In the Palermo area, the Botanical Garden in Plaza Italia and the stunning 3 de Febrero parks are common attractions for locals and tourists, but for those that like to stray out a little more, we chose 3 off the beaten path parks in Buenos Aires that are also well worth exploring.

1- Parque de la Memoria

pensar es un hecho revolucionario

PH: Gustav´s

This spot along the coast of the Río de la Plata was created to commemorate the victims of the military coup. It’s outdoor sculptures and monuments by the river side, its quality art exhibit, and its archives and documentation center make it an interesting place to learn more about the local identity and indelibly marked by this tragic moment of the local history. Avenida Costanera Norte Rafael Obligado 6745, downtown.

2- Parque Centenario

parque centenario

PH Beatrice Murch

Located in Caballito and designed by Carlos Thays, Parque Centenario is a favourite in the area where people often gather to spend some time outdoors and share some mates. There is a small lake in the middle, as well as an astronomy association on the side of the premises, an amphitheatre where there is usually a program of free live concerts,  Argentine Museum of National Sciences, and a weekend book fair.  Av. Patricias Argentinas, Caballito

3- Parque Avellaneda

casa olivares

PH paula soler-moya

A little further away,  in the neighborhood of Flores, is this stunning park with a little choo choo train that goes around it and a contemporary arts center located in the beautiful Casona de los Olivera which dates back to the 1800’s.  Av. Directorio and Lacarra, Flores. 

 

 

Must see in Buenos Aires #2

Parque 3 de Febrero

One of the great aspects of Buenos Aires is its glorious sunshine. Leisure, on a day such as today, is a privilege to take advantage of and a great way to do this is by exploring the Tres de Febrero parks in Palermo. Between Av. Libertador and Lugones, and extending from Av. Casares in Palermo to La Pampa in Belgrano, this group of parks is composed of 25ha made up of 15 public parks and 21 private sport clubs.  Some of the highlights for those getting to know the city include the “Rosedal”, an extensive rose garden, the Sivori museum of art, the planetarium and the Japanese gardens which host a myriad of activities related to Japanese culture.

A little bit of history:

Originally the land belonged to Juan Manuel de Rosas, one of the first famous caudillos and governor of Buenos Aires. Upon his defeat at the battle of Caseros which took place on the Third of February of 1852 (hence the name of the park),  the civil war ended and the lands became public property.
On 11th of November of 1875 President Nicolas Avellaneda inaugurated the parks by planting a magnolia americana (grandiflora) which is still standing today next to the Adolfo Berro Avenue, nearby the Japanese gardens.

Map:


http://maps.google.es/maps/ms?hl=es&gl=es&ie=UTF8&msa=0&msid=207315047227197107144.00049d6b85f96944a2558&ll=-34.570083,-58.412118&spn=0.014135,0.021415&z=15&output=embed
Ver Parque tres de Febrero en un mapa más grande