Recommended Tours in Buenos Aires

(Photo by Jocelyn Mandryk)

 

Buenos Aires Local Tours: Buenos Aires Local Tours are free tours of Palermo, Abasto, Congreso and Plaza de Mayo and are a great way to get to know the city and the public transport system! Jonathan, the friendly Englishman in charge, takes visitors to both city landmarks and to lesser-known charmers that are often overlooked, with the purpose of showing the unseen side of the city. The tour is by foot, public bus and subway so some coins are needed but other than that there is no cost (although a well deserved tip is welcome).  The meeting point is the Garibaldi Statue in Plaza Italia at 11 am on Mondays through Saturdays. More information here.

San Telmo Art Walk: The San Telmo Art Walk is offered by Juanele every Tuesday and Thursday at 3pm and guides you through the who is who and what is what of these art-ridden streets. The three-hour walk includes a tour of both the street art and galleries. A great way to get to know the current Buenos Aires art scene whilst getting to know its charming old-style San Telmo neighborhood. More information here.

Foto Ruta: Professional photographer Jocelyn Mandryk (who took Fierro’s latest photographs) and her associate Becky Hayes have taken tourist photography to a whole new level on their Saturday Foto Ruta tours.  What they propose is to get to know the city from another point of view, taking their travelers through off the beaten path locations and setting creative guidelines for the photographs so that they can explore the local colors and characters through the lens from a new perspective, finding what they normally wouldn’t on a typical tourist location. An added element is brought to the experience as the tour group gathers towards the end, sharing and discussing the pictures and different interpretations of the guidelines.

The Foto Ruta tour runs every Saturday from 2pm-6pm and costs 100 pesos. Upcoming locations are listed on the Foto Ruta webpage.

Graffiti Mundo: Aiming to promote the urban art scene in Buenos Aires, Graffitimundo offers off the beaten path tours of the city’s street art. Group tours, Bike tours and Private tours are available for those interested in learning more about these unique murals and the political and social context behind them.  For those looking to get involved in the creative process itself they offer a great stencil workshop as well.

More information on Graffitimundo tours, workshops and local street artists here.

Argentina Polo Day: To really get to know Polo, and why not, play it, Argentina Polo Day have put together an excursion combining a taste of traditional foods and wines, relaxing and leisure by the pool and amidst nature, and of course horseback riding, polo lessons, polo matches and the chance to interact with some of the best local players and coaches.

Argentina Polo Day takes place in a countryside setting at just a 45-minute car ride away from Buenos Aires, and transportation can be arranged if needed. The tours run every day and must be booked in advance. More information here.

Cooking Tours with Teresita: Different cooking classes and food tours are offered in this bed and breakfast in the outskirts of the city. Whether its a short empanada lesson, a one day food tour or a chance to make asado you’re sure to enjoy this popular option, where you will be able to cook and sample delicious local food and wines. More information here.

The Man Tour: Landing Pad BA offers this exclusive tour for gentlemen in which the Caballito, Congreso and Belgrano neighborhoods are toured with special stops at a traditional barber for a hot lather and straight razor shave, at a hatter for a fitting using techniques and equipment from the 1920´s, and finally at a cigar bar for a complimentary drink and cigar. More information here.

Argentina Christmas Cuisine

The  local Christmas menu has incorporated recipes from many of its different immigrants. Because it is summer in Argentine during the holiday season, there is usually a spread of cold cuts (including cold chicken and turkey, cooked the day before) and salads, whilst asados are also very popular. The midnight toast is traditionally done with cider and accompanied by sweets.  Below is a description of the most typical local Christmas dishes.

Asado: Alright, saying that asado is a typical Christmas staple might be an overstatement considering asado is a local staple period! But on Christmas Eve,  the parrillas get going and the city streets are filled with the sizzling aroma of the Argentine barbeque. Additionally, the Christmas asado is often more elaborate than the usual and it is common to find roast suckling pig on the menu.

Vitel Thoné: This is probably THE most typical holiday platter in Argentina and is predictably an imported recipe from Italy. The cold dish consists of  sliced veal covered in a sauce made from anchovies, tuna, mayonnaise, cream and capers. Recipe here.

(Photo by manusmenu)

Piononos: The origin of this dish is not quite clear although there is a sweet version of pionono in Spain. In Argentina they are made in both sweet and salty variations and consist of a thin flat sponge cake which is filled with ham, palm heart, mayonnaise, and other variations for salty versions (with the contrast of the sweet dough), and with dulce de leche (what did you expect?) and fruits and whipped  cream for sweet versions.  Once the ingredients are layered on the sponge cake it is rolled up and voila! Recipe here.

(Photo by From Argentina with Love)

Pan Dulce: Like Vitel Thoné, Pan Dulce is another really typical holiday staple that was also imported by the Italian immigrants. The brioche like high-rise dough filled with dried fruits and nuts is the perfect complement to the sweet cider brought out at midnight on Christmas Eve.  Recipe hereand add some drops of orange blossom water to that for the special local flavor!

(Photo by Gabriela Sellart)

Turrón: The popular Spanish Christmas specialty was incorporated into the local traditions, where it is common to serve peanut and honey turron with the pan dulce at midnight.

(Photo by formalfallacy)

Chimichurri

(Photo by NicoledeB)

 

Chimichurri is a traditional sauce made from herbs, garlic and vinegar that is used on meat at asados.  It is said that the name of the sauce comes from the British. Allegedly, the English men associated the spice-based sauce with curry, so when they wanted it they said “give me curry” which was locally understood as chimichurri.

There are many ways to make the sauce and we have included just one of the many recipes. Whichever way it’s done  we recommend you make it a few days ahead to enhance the flavor.

 

Ingredients:

● 250 ml water (1 cup)

● 60 ml vinegar (¼ cup)

● 60 ml vegetable oil (¼ cup)

● 1 Tbsp coarse salt

● 1 Tbsp dried oregano

● 1 Tbsp thyme

● 1 Tbsp ground chili pepper

● 1 Bay leaf

●  Fresh parsley

● 5 garlic cloves, chopped

Preparation:

Heat the water, vinegar and salt until they boil.

Mix all the other ingredients except for the oil and incorporate them to the water mixture.

Allow to cool at room temperature.

Add the oil.

Store covered in a glass jar.

 

We Recommend: Cooking Classes in Buenos Aires

 

One of the best parts of traveling is trying the local food, and, for those who like to cook, discovering how to make it! Alfajores, empanadas, asado, locro stew, chimichurri sauce, dulce de leche, and pastries are all part of our traditional menu. We are sure you will enjoy tasting these savory meals and recommend you try making them by taking a cooking class in English.  Find some options below:

(Making empanadas by Scorbette37)

 

Cooking with Teresita:

Different cooking class options are offered in this bed and breakfast in the outskirts of the city. Whether its a short empanada lesson, a one day food tour or a chance to make asado you’re sure to enjoy this popular option, where you will be able to cook and sample delicious food and wines.

 

Contact:

http://www.try2cook.com

4293-5992

teresitabella@gmail.com

 

Argentine Cooking Clases

Norma is a warm and welcoming woman who teaches how to make empanadas, locro, and alfajores in her Saturday classes where you will also enjoy a great lunch with wine. The plus side is that her classes are in Belgrano.

 

Contact:

http://www.argentinecookingclasses.com/

nsoued@gmail.com

15 4470 2267

 

Cecilia D’Imperio

Certified chef, Cecilia D’Imperio, has been teaching cooking classes for twenty years having written books and articles as well. She teaches a variety of personalized courses and short seminars, which you can adapt to fit in your schedule.

 

Contact:

http://www.ceciliadeimperio.com

info@ceciliadeimperio.com

 

Other links:

How to Make a Typical Argentine Asado

How to Make Dulce de Leche

Rabbit Empanadas Recipe

Hernan Gipponi’s White Salmon with Sauteed Squid