Top 5 Argentine Desserts

(Photo by Manu Contreras)

Most Argentine desserts were influenced by different immigrant groups who populated the country.  A few ingredients however, including the famous dulce de leche and quince, sweet potato, fig and chayote jams, have given them a unique local flavor. Below is a list of top five typical Argentine desserts.

Vigilante: This is probably the most emblematic Argentine dessert and is rumored o have been Borges’ favorite. It consists of a slice of solid quince or sweet potato jam (in Salta it is also served with chayote and fig jam) over a slice of Port Salut type cheese.

Flan con dulce de leche: Flan is a dessert that was adopted locally from different immigrant influences. The delicious creamy egg based treat is typically eaten with dulce de leche or with dulce de leche and whipped cream (flan mixto). Another similar dessert from Colonial times is Ambrosia, which is said to have been Domingo Faustino Sarmiento’s top choice.

Budin de pan: Commonly known in English as bread pudding this dessert has many variations around the world. The Argentine version consists of a smooth dessert (no chunks) with raisins and like flan is also served with dulce de leche and whipped cream.

Arroz con leche: Rice pudding is another international dessert that has become a typical local delicacy. The sweet rice concoction was very popular amongst the gauchos and in the north of the country there is a similar dessert prepared with white corn instead of rice called Mazamorra.

Panqueque con dulce de leche : The French crepe was quickly adopted by the locals and transformed into a typical delicacy with a warm gooey dulce de leche filling. A delicious sweet treat that no DDL lover should miss.

Those who have perfected their own versions of local delicacies (sweet or salty) can’t miss Seashells & Sunflowers 2012 Argentine Recipe Contest.

Membrillo

(Photo by jlastras)

Those who have taken a liking to the local pastries may have noticed that many come with a filling of Quince Jam (Membrillo). This fruit preserve, which was brought to Argentina by the Spaniards, is very popular in local sweets and deserts, including the aforementioned pastries, quince pies and combined with cheese for the typical “queso y dulce” desert. Allthough it is definitely not as popular as dulce de leche, the crimson sweet tart jam with a grainy texture is the favorite of those who prefer something less sugary and rich. We suggest you try it and if you like it you can take this recipe back home with you as a souvenir.

Quince Jam

Ingredients:

1 kilo/ 2 lbs of Quince

700 gr/  3 ½ cups of sugar

1- Boil the quince with the skin on for ten minutes.

2- Rinse and peel the quince, halve and discard the seeds.

3- Process the quince pulp in a food processor or blender.

4- Place the blended quince in a pot and add ¾ cups of sugar for every cup of quince.

5- Cook on very low heat whilst stirring with a wooden spoon for 30-45 minutes or until the quince pulls away from the pot.

6-  Pour the quince jam into a wet tube pan and cool.

7-  Remove jam from the pan and wrap in foil

8-  Serve a slice of quince jam with a slice of cheese or keep in the refrigerator.