Local Specialties to Indulge your Sweet Tooth.

Grey cold days like the ones we’ve been having lately are great for comforting afternoon snacks in traditional teahouses such as Las Violetas in Almagro or Confiteria La Ideal downtown. Here are some local specialties to sweeten the afternoon.

Dulce de leche: Probably the most famous of Argentine sweets, this caramel cream is used in pastries, spread on toast, eaten by the spoonful and included in all kinds of desserts.

Alfajores:  A typical sandwich like snack made up of two “cookies” usually filled by, you guessed it, dulce de leche, (although there are variety’s filled with fruit jams and chocolate  as well) and covered in chocolate, confectionary, sugar or coconut. More information about alfajores is available here.

Rogel Cake: A very sweet cake made with alternating layers of puff pastry and dulce de leche and topped with meringue.

Pasta Frola Quince pie: Another typical sweet used in pastry’s and deserts is Quince paste (dulce de membrillo) and candied yam jam (dulce de batata), which are often combined with cheese for dessert. Quince paste also the main ingredient of Pasta Frola, a fruity pie that goes well with coffee.

Medialunas and Facturas: The local croissants and pastry’s come in many varieties. There are two types of medialunas (croissants), de grasa (made with lard) or de manteca (made with butter). The first is crunchier and thin, the second puffy and moist. Amongst the pastries you will find varieties with dulce de leche, with quince and yam jam, and with custard (crema pastelera).

Vainillas: These very lightweight  airy “cookies”  made from egg, vanilla and sugar are the favorite of many local children (and adults who wont admit it) who dunk them in milk as an afternoon snack.

Submarino: Another thing Argies like to dunk is a bar of chocolate in a cup of hot milk for a local take on a typical winter comforter.

We Recommend: Cooking Classes in Buenos Aires

 

One of the best parts of traveling is trying the local food, and, for those who like to cook, discovering how to make it! Alfajores, empanadas, asado, locro stew, chimichurri sauce, dulce de leche, and pastries are all part of our traditional menu. We are sure you will enjoy tasting these savory meals and recommend you try making them by taking a cooking class in English.  Find some options below:

(Making empanadas by Scorbette37)

 

Cooking with Teresita:

Different cooking class options are offered in this bed and breakfast in the outskirts of the city. Whether its a short empanada lesson, a one day food tour or a chance to make asado you’re sure to enjoy this popular option, where you will be able to cook and sample delicious food and wines.

 

Contact:

http://www.try2cook.com

4293-5992

teresitabella@gmail.com

 

Argentine Cooking Clases

Norma is a warm and welcoming woman who teaches how to make empanadas, locro, and alfajores in her Saturday classes where you will also enjoy a great lunch with wine. The plus side is that her classes are in Belgrano.

 

Contact:

http://www.argentinecookingclasses.com/

nsoued@gmail.com

15 4470 2267

 

Cecilia D’Imperio

Certified chef, Cecilia D’Imperio, has been teaching cooking classes for twenty years having written books and articles as well. She teaches a variety of personalized courses and short seminars, which you can adapt to fit in your schedule.

 

Contact:

http://www.ceciliadeimperio.com

info@ceciliadeimperio.com

 

Other links:

How to Make a Typical Argentine Asado

How to Make Dulce de Leche

Rabbit Empanadas Recipe

Hernan Gipponi’s White Salmon with Sauteed Squid

How to Make Dulce de Leche

(Photo by Sunday Driver)

Those who have been to Argentina will surely agree that dulce de leche is an instantly acquired taste, and have probably taken some back home with them. Now we challenge you to try making your own!

You will need:

-A copper pot
-1 litre of milk
– 200 grams of sugar
-1 teaspoon of baking soda dissolved in half a cup of water
– Vanilla extract (approximately a tablespoon or to taste)

Begin by bringing the milk and sugar to a boil on a very low fire and stirring constantly.
Slowly add the dissolved baking soda and vanilla, continue stirring.
Continue to cook until it acquires the typical brown color of this dulce de leche. (It will take approximately 2 hours).

Let us know how it went and how you like to eat your dulce de leche the most!