Locro

locro

(Local Locro: Chris Ford)

Every 25th of May, Argentinian locals celebrate the May Revolution in 1810 that led to the country’s independence from Spain in 1816. It is a national holiday, and for celebratory purposes, traditional food, perfect for the colder weather of autumn and winter days, is prepared for the occasion. Such is the case with locro, a thick winter slow-cooked stew rooted in the country’s often overlooked indigenous heritage.

Called ruqru in the Quechua language, this soup has white corn (hominy) and white beans as its base ingredients, and is prepared with winter vegetables such as pumpkin, carrots, potatos, sweet potatos and a variety of meats including stewing meat, pork, bacon and other variants.

A great place to join in the local 25 de Mayo celebrations and try locro is Feria de Mataderos where there will also be traditional music and dances. Otherwise, you can find a list of suggested places to eat locro here.

Todos los 25 de mayo, los argentinos celebran la Revolución de Mayo de 1810 que condujo a que el país se independizara de españa en 1816. La fecha es un feriado nacional, y, con el motivo de festejar, se preparan platos típicos, ideales para los días más frescos del otoño y el invierno. Uno de esos platos es el locro, una sopa sustanciosa que se cocina a fuego lento, y que tiene su origen en las tradiciones, a veces olvidadas, de las comunidades indígenas nativas. 

Conocida como ruqru en quechua, la sopa está hecha a base de poroto y maíz blanco, combinado con vegetales de estación tales como zapallo, zanahoria, batata y papa, y también con distintos cortes de carne vacuna y de cerdo. 

Quienes quieran probarlo y participar de otros festejos tradicionales relacionados a la fecha patria, pueden acercarse a la Feria de Mataderos. Si no, también pueden pasar a probar locro en uno de los lugares recomendados en esta lista. 

History and Art and MNBA

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The Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes (MNBA) in Recoleta, recently inaugurated an exhibition of Argentine artist Ariel Mlynarzewicz works. The showcase features different portraits of local historical figures that the artist painted for the bicentennial of the May independence wars. The exhibition also features a series of documentaries that show the artistic process and also, interviews that the artist carried out with historians and other renowned figures of the local culture to better understand the subjects of his works. The paintings will be on display until the 22nd of September. The museum is also showcasing an excellent exhibition of Argentine artist Pío Collivadino’s works.  Av. del Libertador 1473, Recoleta.

This Week in Buenos Aires

Monday

(Photo by TheFutureIsUnwritten)

The MALBA is showcasing a new exhibit until the 1st of July on the work of Grete Stern.  Avenida Figueroa Alcorta 3415, Recoleta. 4808-6500.

In the evening stop by La Peña del Colorado that serves traditional food and stages live shows as well as hosting folklore dances for the community.  From midnight onwards they also encourage the diners to play spontaneous guitar music. (They offer the guitars).  Güemes 3657, Palermo. 4822-1038. info@lapeniadelcolorado.com.

Tuesday

(Photo by PortalComic)

Take a private tour with Buenos Aires Historico Tours. Their guides are historians and other humanities graduates from the Buenos Aires University and they will show you a unique side of the city! 4307-8539.buenosaireshistorico@yahoo.com.ar

Polish your Spanish and make new friends at the Tuesday conversation classes organized by Bueno, Dale! Spanish School in different city bars. The hour long practice sessions are open for all levels and all one must do is show up from 7pm to 8pm with a 30-peso fee. The location of each event is announced via Facebook.

 

Wednesday

(Photo by :Antonio)

Take a walk down Pasaje Rivarola, a beautiful hidden street which appears to be stuck in time in the historical downtown area. Built in 1926 and characterized by its mirrored buildings on both sides, it is a regular location for film productions looking for an old fashioned feel. Whilst you’re there visit “La Chacarita de Los Relojes”, a small shop specializing in antique clock and watch restoration.

Later on stop by La Catedral in Almagro where you can take a tango lesson starting at 7.30 pm or 9pm. Sarmiento 4006, Almagro.

Thursday

(Photo by gdiazdeleon)

Book a special shopping tour with Creme de la Creme. Roam the vintage scene, find the perfect souvenir, get into local designers or discover the art scene in Buenos Aires.  More information here.

Book your place for one of Anuva Wine tastings and discover great Argentine wines.

Friday

(Photo by tomasfer)

Check out the newly remodeled A-line subway and stop at some of the city’s most emblematic historic landmarks including Plaza de Mayo and the Casa Rosada, Casa de la Cultura, Café Tortoni and 36 Billares, Congress, Las Violetas and Parque Centenario.

If you are a Beatles fan head to Boris Club de Jazz where Nube 9 will stage a live show at 10pm and interpret the White Album. Gorriti 5568, Palermo.

Saturday and Sunday

(Photo by Lumiago)

Remember to make a reservation for Hernán Gipponi’s unique must-try brunch, served on Saturdays and Sundays! Soler 5862, Palermo Hollywood. 3220-6800.  info@hgrestaurant.com.ar

In the spirit of Easter go on an easter egg chocolate shopping spree at gourmet chocolateries Vassalisa in Recoleta, Tikal in Palermo, and Compañia de Chocolates in Palermo and Recoleta.  We also recommed you try the traditional rosca de pascua.

PM Open air music– Outdoor live music, art and more merge in this new Saturday event which takes place in Palermo from 2pm to 9pm. Paraguay 4905, Palermo

Don’t miss the free concert at the Colón Theatre at 11 am on Sunday. Pick up your tickets in advance! Cerrito 628, Downtown.

On Sunday The Killers will be staging a live show at GEBA. Tickets here.

Find a ten-day weather forecast here.

At the Buenos Aires Core: Av. Corrientes

Avenida Corrientes is one of the city’s most emblematic avenues and spans from Puerto Madero to the Chacarita cemetery. Known as the street that never sleeps, due to the many theatres and cafes that line it, it is full of history and local identity.

 

(Photo by ‘J’)

It’s hard to believe that the lively avenue was once a narrow dirt road, but that is how it started out in the XVIII century. When Domingo Acasssuso inaugurated the San Nicolás de Bari temple (where the obelisk is today and where the Argentine flag was first raised in Buenos Aires), the street began to acquire a greater importance and progressively expanded. It had many different names and finally settled on Corrientes in 1822 to honor the Corrientes province’s involvement in the Argentine independence.

During the early 20th century, the first theatres began to open as well as cafes and restaurants. Tango was acquiring a great popularity in the city and the Abasto area boomed with Corrientes Av. at its heart.

 

(Photo by Evandro Flores)

Today, Av. Corrientes is one of the cultural epicenters of the city where live music acts, film screenings and theatre are always on offer. The Revue and music hall are genres that have been locally accepted and their main attractions are scantily dressed feather clad vedettes (female singers and entertainers). The area is also known for its bookstores, traditional cafe’s such as La Giralda and Gato Negro, and pizza venues such as Las Cuartetas and Guerrin.

A New A Line

(Photo by casimira parabolica)

After a heartfelt last ride in the city’s antique subway wagons, the historic A line closed down during the Summer for remodeling and maintenance. Today at 8pm a modern new subway opens to the public. Although the picturesque wagons with their wooden seating, dim lights and manually operated doors will be missed, the new wagons will be air-conditioned and will once again allow tourists to stop at some of the city’s most emblematic historic landmarks including Plaza de Mayo and the Casa Rosada, Casa de la Cultura, Café Tortoni and 36 Billares, Congress, Las Violetas and Parque Centenario. Additionally, the stations have been intervened by some of the city’s most talented street artists including Triángulo Dorado, Martín Ron Murales, Dame, Nazza Stencil, Georgina Ciotti, Stencilland and Run Don’t Walk.

 

Into the Past at Casa del Historiador

(Photo by Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires)

La Casa del Historiador in San Telmo, known to many as casa del Virrey Liniers, is one of the city’s historical landmarks and dates back to the XVIII century. The house belonged to one of the country´s viceroys,  Santiago de Liniers, who played a key role in the reconquering of Buenos Aires after the British invasions.  It is the only remaining colonial house in the city, preserved for years as such by the Estrada publishing house.  Today, this emblem of the local history belongs to the city government and functions as a museum in which the Buenos Aires colonial period is depicted.

(Photo courtesy of La Perichona)

One of the highlights of this historical landmark is La Perichona Despensa de Comidas, a charming deli inside the house named after the Viceroy’s lover (who has a colorful story of her own). The XVIII century Andalusian patio with outdoor seating is the perfect spot to stop for a bite on a sunny day.

Venezuela 469, San Telmo. 4974-0265.  info@laperichona.com

This Week in Buenos Aires

Monday

(Photo by bogavanterojo)

Start the week off by getting a general picture of Buenos Aires with Jonathan who offers free daily walking tours that start at 11am from the Garibaldi Statue at Plaza Italia. More information here.

In the evening stop by La Peña del Colorado .This Palermo-centered peña serves traditional food and stages live shows as well as hosting folklore dances for the community.  From midnight onwards they also encourage the diners to play spontaneous guitar music. (They offer the guitars).  Güemes 3657, Palermo. 4822-1038. info@lapeniadelcolorado.com.

Tuesday

 

(Photo by t.bo79)

Stop by the new Gardel exhibit that is being showcased at the Casa de la Cultura until the 30th of April. The exhibition features the largest tango collection in the world! Av. De Mayo 575, first floor, downtown.

In the evening head to Boris Club de Jazz where Russian Red will be staging a live show starting at 10pm. Gorriti 5568, Palermo.

 

Wednesday

 

(Photo  by Celine Aussourd)

Summer is the time for outdoor sightseeing and there are some great tours by air and water that make for perfect alternatives to get to know the city in a fun and novel way.

Later on stop by La Catedral in Almagro where you can take a tango lesson staring at 7.30 pm or 9pm. Sarmiento 4006, Almagro.

Thursday

 

(Photo by vmiramontes)

Stop for a light lunch at hierbabuena in San Telmo and then check out the Margarita Paksa exhibit at the  MAMBA !  Av. San Juan 350, San Telmo.  4342-3001.

Book your place at Fierro Hotel’s Thursday wine tasting and sample some great Argentine wines, chosen by the president of the Argentine Sommelier Association Andres Rosberg and in-house Sommelier Martin Bruno. Tastings  include special tapas from Hernán Gipponi Restaurant. Soler 5862, Palermo. 3220-6800.

Friday

(Photo by ::: M @ X :::)

Book your place for the full parrilla experience with Parrilla Tour. These filling excursions, which take place in San Telmo on Fridays, will surely leave you satisfied.

In the evening stop by Fierro´s Thank Fierro its Friday Happy Hour from 6pm to 8.30 pm and then head to one of the city’s top bars such as Isabel, Frank’s Bar, Unicorn Huset or 878! Soler 5862, Palermo. 3220-6800.

Saturday and Sunday

(Photo by dlev1979)

Remember to make a reservation for Hernán Gipponi’s unique must-try brunch, served on Saturdays and Sundays! Soler 5862, Palermo Hollywood. 3220-6800.  info@hgrestaurant.com.ar.

PM Open air music– Outdoor live music, art and more merge in this new Saturday event which takes place in Palermo from 2pm to 9pm. Paraguay 4905, Palermo

Find a ten-day weather forecast here and don’t forget to stop for ice cream at one of these fantastic Buenos Aires heladerias!