The Buenos Aires Port

(Photo by DMWyllie)

Do you ever wonder why people from Buenos Aires are locally referred to as ¨porteños¨? The answer is simple; it is because Buenos Aires is a port city. It was founded on the river where the port would be, and then it progressively expanded around it, as did the country. Thus, the historical relevance of the port is of great importance and also key in understanding the geographic and economic distribution of Argentina, and the cultural identity in some of its aspects.

In 1536 Pedro de Mendoza, a Spanish conquistador, founded Buenos Aires city on the banks of the Riachuelo (where La Boca is today), which drains into the Rio de La Plata river basin. Many other rivers drain into the basin as well and it was a straight access to the Atlantic ocean, so it was a key location. During this period however, it didn’t officially function as a port because the Spanish crown forbade it; its role was to be a strategic point from which to conquer the whole Rio de la Plata area with the benefit of having low tides and high riverbanks, which made it difficult for warships to approach.

It wasn’t until 1776, when the Viceroyalty of the Rio de la Plata was formed, that the area really began to develop.  The port, which was allready being used for clandestine commerce (and- it is suspected- to transport South American silver to Spain), expanded. At the same time, England was industrializing and was in need of raw materials and markets to sell to, so goods started to flow through the port. In fact, it was such a strategic location and was expanding at such a rate that many European powers were interested in occupying it.  In the early 1800’s the British invaded it twice, without success, as the locals defended their city, sparking a sense of national identity that would lead to the Argentine independence in 1810.

From independence onwards the port continued to grow and was a protagonist of the migratory currents in the 1850’s, promoted by the first Argentine constitution, and later in the post world war periods. Centralis (“Unitarian”) policies from the founding years, concentrated economic activities around Buenos Aires and the port; the nation expanded around it, with much of its immigration settling in the city rather than populating the rest of the country as had been expected.  Thousands of immigrants populated the port and surrounding areas where they lived in conventillos (tenements).  This moment in Argentine history defined the local identity and is reflected in tangos, in Quinquela Martin’s art and in literature.

For practical purposes, in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s the port was moved to where Puerto Madero is now. Later it expanded to Puerto Nuevo where the port operates today.

This Week in Buenos Aires

Monday

(Photo by ollarte.olie)

Literature enthusiasts will have a whole week to explore detective fiction at the Buenos Aires Negra festival which will feature book readings, films, theatre, and a fake-trial, amongst others activities. From the 11th-17th of June. Find the full program here.

In the evening don’t miss out on La Bomba del Tiempo, a percussion orchestra that has become one of the local absolute musts. Centro Cultural Konex Sarmiento 3131, Abasto. 4864-3200

 

Tuesday

(Photo by Sebastian-Dario)

Don’t miss the temporary exhibit on Jesuit missionary cultural activities in Latin America, being held at the Museo de Arte Hispanoamericano Isaac Fernandez Blanco. Tours of the museum are also available in English with prior booking at 4327-0272 or mifb_educativa@buenosaires.gob.ar. Suipacha 1422, Downtown.

In the evening don’t miss the special production of Rinaldo, an opera by Georg Friedrich Händel, which will be staged at the Colón theatre on the 12th, 15th, 17th, and 19th of June. Tickets here.

 

Wednesday

(Photo by blmurch)

Whilst touring Recoleta don’t forget to stop by the Palais de Glace where a special photography exhibit is being held until the 9th of July.  Opening hours: Tue-Sun midday-8pm. Posadas 1725, Recoleta.

In the evening head to the Abasto neighborhood for a taste of tango presented by the Orquesta Típica Fernandez Fierro at the Club Atletico Fernández Fierro. Sánchez de Bustamante 764, Abasto. caff@fernandezfierro.com.

 

Thursday

(Photo by Gustav’s)

Stop by Argentina’s national library and learn more about this historically rich site. Guided tours are available on weekdays from 10am-2pm with prior reservation at 4808-6025 visitas@bn.gov.ar. Additionally, the library hosts many exhibits and cultural events. Find a full program here.  Aguero 2502, Palermo. 4808-6040. contacto@bn.gov.ar.

Close to the library is the Museo del Libro y de la Lengua (the book and language museum), also worth visiting. Open from Tuesdays to Sundays from 2pm-7pm.  Av. Las Heras 2555, Recoleta. 4808-0090.  museodellibro@bn.gov.ar

For a unique evening, book your place at Fierro Hotel’s Thursday wine tasting and sample some great Argentine wines, chosen by the president of the Argentine Sommelier Association Andres Rosberg and in-house Sommelier Martin Bruno. Tastings, which include special tapas from Hernán Gipponi Restaurant, cost 25 USD per person and are limited to 7 people. Soler 5862, Palermo. 3220-6800.

 

Friday

(Photo by Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires)

Visit the Feria de las Artes at the Plazoleta San Francisco on the corner of Alsina and Defensa.  Whilst you’re in the area don’t forget to stop by the Cafe Tortoni for coffee and medialunas (croissants).

In the evening don’t miss the special production of Rinaldo, an opera by Georg Friedrich Händel, which will be staged at the Colón theatre on the 12th, 15th, 17th, and 19th of June. Tickets here.

 

Saturday and Sunday

(Photo by fotosterona)

The best of contemporary Argentine design will be on display from the 14th to the 20th of June at Feria Puro Diseño in La Rural. Sarmiento 2704, Palermo.

Head to the Planetarium in Palermo for one of the special screenings of Journey to the Stars. You can also access the planetariums telescopes to get unique views of the sky. Av. Sarmiento and Belisario Roldan. 4772-9265

On Sunday don’t miss the special production of Rinaldo, an opera by Georg Friedrich Händel, which will be staged at the Colón theatre on the 12th, 15th, 17th, and 19th of June. Tickets here.

Also on Sunday, to end the Buenos Aires Negra festival, there will be a Venetian Party at FILO starting at 10pm. San Martin 975, Downtown.

5 Emblematic Women in Argentine History

(Photo by Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com)

Cecilia Grierson – 1859-1934

Cecilia Grierson was the first female doctor in the country. She graduated from the University of Buenos Aires as a surgeon-doctor in 1889 and began working at the Ramos Mejia Hospital (back then, San Roque Hospital).  She founded the first school of nurses, the Argentine first aid association, and the institute for the blind in Buenos Aires.

She also traveled to London and became the vice-president of the International Women’s Congress and studied gynecology in France.

Rosario Vera Peñaloza- 1873-1950

Rosario Vera Peñaloza dedicated her life to education. She founded the first Argentine kindergarten in La Rioja. She was also a head mistress in many schools around the country.

In 1931 the national education committee entrusted her with the creation of the first national museum for primary education. Her date of death was declared the national kindergarten teacher’s day.

Alicia Moreau Justo- 1885-1986

Alicia Moreau Justo was born in London but moved to Buenos Aires with her family when she was five. She was doctor and political activist who fought for women’s rights.

In 1902 she founded the women’s socialist center and was one of the founders of the women’s pro-suffrage committee.

She was also married to one Juan B. Justo, an influential politician, journalist, physician and writer with whom she had three children.

Victoria Ocampo- 1890-1979

Victoria Ocampo was an Argentine writer and intellectual.

She was born into an aristocratic family and traveled from an early age to Europe, which helped form her cultural identity.

She was a part of the feminist movement and founded Sur magazine, which was the most important literary magazine of its time in Latin America. Authors such as Sabato, Borges, Cortazar and Camus were published in it, amongst many other prominent authors.

She also edited and supported an anti-nazi magazine during world war II.

In 1976 she was appointed the first woman member of the Argentine Academy of Letters.

She frequently received visits from internationally renowned writers, artists and thinkers at her residence, which is open to visits. More information is available here.

Evita- 1919-1952

Evita is the most iconic woman in Argentine history. Born in Los Toldos, in the Province of Buenos Aires, she was first an actress, and then a politician.

She married Juan Domingo Peron in 1944 and became the face of Peronism.

As a first lady she is credited with having played an essential part in obtaining women’s voting rights and organizing the feminine branch of the Peronist political party. She established and ran the Fundacion Eva Peron, dedicated to social work.

She died of cancer when she was 33 and it is estimated that over a million people assisted her wake.

More information on Evita is available at  the Evita Museum.

Buenos Aires Shakespeare Festival

(Photo by tonynetone)

Throughout the week, until Sunday the 19th, the city will be celebrating the famous English playwright at the 2nd annual Shakespeare festival. Free activities including calligraphy lessons, performances, workshops, and more will be held in different venues and theatres around the city. Additionally there will be a recreation of a medieval village in Buenos Aires Polo Circo (on Combate de los Pozos and Juan de Garay streets) where visitors will be able to enjoy Elizabethan designs, archery, dancing, cuisine, amongst other attractions. Information on activities and theatre productions during the Shakespeare Festival are available here.

This Week in Buenos Aires

Monday

(Photo by rodrigoferrari)

 

Don’t miss the Photography Biennial being held at the Centro Cultural Borges, right next to Galerias Pacifico. More than 220 artists from 39 countries are exhibiting their works that will be auctioned on the 14th of February at the MALBA. All the auctions proceeds are to go to Save the Children and Fleni Foundation. Opening hours: Mon-Sat 10am-9pm, Sun midday-9pm. Viamonte 525, downtown. 5555 5358/9. info@ccborges.org.ar,

In the evening New York City dance-punk band The Rapture will be staging an upbeat concert at Palermo Groove. Tickets here.

 

Tuesday

(Photo by piano piano!)

The Museo de Arte Decorativo is showcasing a special exhibit on Russian Icons and art from Tibet. Additionally the museums marvelous collection of European and Oriental paintings and sculptures, the great hall and the impressive staircase make it well worth a visit.  Av.del Libertador 1902, Recoleta.  4801-8248. Tuesdays to Sundays from 2.00pm to 7.00pm.  Guided tours in English are available every day at 2pm.

Later on head to Doppelganger Bar in San Telmo for some of the city’s best drinks and atmosphere. Juan de Garay 500, San Telmo.4300 0201.

 

Wednesday

(Photo by melvelez)

Explore the Tres de Febrero parks in Palermo. Between Av. Libertador and Lugones, and extending from Av. Casares in Palermo to La Pampa in Belgrano, this group of parks is composed of 25ha made up of 15 public parks and 21 private sport clubs and includes the “Rosedal”, an extensive rose garden, the Sivori Museum, the Planetarium and the Japanese Gardens.

Il Ballo del Mattone is putting on their Bossa Nova Wednesdays where they serve typical Italian-Argentine dishes. Gorriti 5950, Palermo. 4776-8648. reservas@ilballo.tv

 

Thursday

(Photo by Luciano Belviso)

For those of you interested in economics and Argentine economic history, head to the Museum of External Debt, which reopens this week, where you can find out more about the economic evolution of the country. Audio guides in English are available. Open: Mon-Fri 11am-7pm. José E. Uriburu 781, 1st floor, Downtown.4374-4448.

Book your place for the Fierro Hotel’s Thursday wine tasting and sample some great Argentine wines, chosen by the president of the Argentine Sommelier Association Andres Rosberg and in-house Sommelier Martin Bruno.  Tastings cost 25 USD per person and are limited to 7 people. Soler 5862, Palermo. 3220-6800.

 

Friday

(Photo by 7scout7)

Book you place with Argentina Polo Day and spend the day out in the outskirts of the city exploring the world of polo. The day includes a wine tasting with ‘empanadas’, horseback riding, a Polo Match, polo lessons , the opportunity to talk to coaches and professional players, a typical asado,  and leisure time by the swimming pool. More information here.

 

Saturday and Sunday

(Photo by fjenciso)

Take a day trip to, La Campiña, a 25 year old orange farm in the Buenos Aires town of San Pedro owned by a couple who wished to turn their love for the land into their life. Visits include a tour of the orange plantation (with the added joy of the orange blossoms perfume in the spring), of the selection process, of a dovecot, jam making area, storage and the restaurant. More information here.

The Buenos Aires Blues Festival kicks off this weekend at La Trastienda. Tickets here.

Recommended Tours in Buenos Aires

(Photo by Jocelyn Mandryk)

 

Buenos Aires Local Tours: Buenos Aires Local Tours are free tours of Palermo, Abasto, Congreso and Plaza de Mayo and are a great way to get to know the city and the public transport system! Jonathan, the friendly Englishman in charge, takes visitors to both city landmarks and to lesser-known charmers that are often overlooked, with the purpose of showing the unseen side of the city. The tour is by foot, public bus and subway so some coins are needed but other than that there is no cost (although a well deserved tip is welcome).  The meeting point is the Garibaldi Statue in Plaza Italia at 11 am on Mondays through Saturdays. More information here.

San Telmo Art Walk: The San Telmo Art Walk is offered by Juanele every Tuesday and Thursday at 3pm and guides you through the who is who and what is what of these art-ridden streets. The three-hour walk includes a tour of both the street art and galleries. A great way to get to know the current Buenos Aires art scene whilst getting to know its charming old-style San Telmo neighborhood. More information here.

Foto Ruta: Professional photographer Jocelyn Mandryk (who took Fierro’s latest photographs) and her associate Becky Hayes have taken tourist photography to a whole new level on their Saturday Foto Ruta tours.  What they propose is to get to know the city from another point of view, taking their travelers through off the beaten path locations and setting creative guidelines for the photographs so that they can explore the local colors and characters through the lens from a new perspective, finding what they normally wouldn’t on a typical tourist location. An added element is brought to the experience as the tour group gathers towards the end, sharing and discussing the pictures and different interpretations of the guidelines.

The Foto Ruta tour runs every Saturday from 2pm-6pm and costs 100 pesos. Upcoming locations are listed on the Foto Ruta webpage.

Graffiti Mundo: Aiming to promote the urban art scene in Buenos Aires, Graffitimundo offers off the beaten path tours of the city’s street art. Group tours, Bike tours and Private tours are available for those interested in learning more about these unique murals and the political and social context behind them.  For those looking to get involved in the creative process itself they offer a great stencil workshop as well.

More information on Graffitimundo tours, workshops and local street artists here.

Argentina Polo Day: To really get to know Polo, and why not, play it, Argentina Polo Day have put together an excursion combining a taste of traditional foods and wines, relaxing and leisure by the pool and amidst nature, and of course horseback riding, polo lessons, polo matches and the chance to interact with some of the best local players and coaches.

Argentina Polo Day takes place in a countryside setting at just a 45-minute car ride away from Buenos Aires, and transportation can be arranged if needed. The tours run every day and must be booked in advance. More information here.

Cooking Tours with Teresita: Different cooking classes and food tours are offered in this bed and breakfast in the outskirts of the city. Whether its a short empanada lesson, a one day food tour or a chance to make asado you’re sure to enjoy this popular option, where you will be able to cook and sample delicious local food and wines. More information here.

The Man Tour: Landing Pad BA offers this exclusive tour for gentlemen in which the Caballito, Congreso and Belgrano neighborhoods are toured with special stops at a traditional barber for a hot lather and straight razor shave, at a hatter for a fitting using techniques and equipment from the 1920´s, and finally at a cigar bar for a complimentary drink and cigar. More information here.

Illustrious Argentines: Carlos Gardel

(Photo by Sebastian-Dario)

Carlos Gardel is a controversial Argentine icon. For starters, he wasn’t born in Argentina; according to the official version he was born on the 11th of December of 1890 in Toulouse, France but many dispute he was an illegitimate child born in Uruguay. At the age of three he moved  with his mother from France to Buenos Aires.  They settled in the neighborhood of Abasto but it wasn´t until later on in his life that he was nationalized as an Argentine.

His music career began early on after dropping out of high school. He already had a great singing voice and was baptized “El Zorzal Criollo” (The Criollo Thrush) by one of his first musical influences, José Betinotti with whom he sang duets, who encouraged him to start singing popular songs at the neighborhood cafes and bars.  Together they recorded their first album and began touring, acquiring increasing popularity. Gardel then went on to star in the silent film “Flor de Durazno”  which brought him even more attention and it was during this period that he began to sing tangos renewing the genres identity.  In 1918 he recorded Flor de Fango and in 1919  De Vuelta al Bulín, progressively building his career.

In 1923 he formed the duet Gardel-Razzano until the later began having trouble with his voice and became Gardel’s manager. Once more as a solo singer his fame skyrocketed as he became increasingly popular in Spain and France.

The talented singer and songwriter began to interact with the silver screen once again on the production of 15 short films, and on one of his trips to France he formed a friendship with non other than Charles Chaplin who opened new doors to him. In 1931 he signed a contract with Paramount pictures to record Luces de Buenos Aires which was musicalized by several tango composers of the time. The film became a hit with the Spanish public and it is said that movie theatres were often asked to pause and rewind the film to play the part where Gardel sang over and over.

His cinematographic and musical career continued to expand and he moved to New York where he participated in many productions until he died in a plane crash in Medellin, Colombia, in 1935.

The talented “Zorzal Criollo” has since become the most remembered tango legend the Buenos Aires streets have seen.

More on Carlos Gardel can be seen in his Abasto house which is now a museum that not only shows exhibits on Gardel and other influential tango composers and singers, but also stages live music and screenings of tango films. Jean Jaurés 735, Abasto. 4964-2015.

Buenos Aires Art Museums

(photo by majisabel)

Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes (MNBA): Set in the heart of Recoleta, the National Fine Arts Museum has 10,000 art pieces by renown national and international artists such as Quinquela Martín, Pettorutti, Prilidiano Pueyrredón, Antonio Berni, Goya, Picasso, Rembrandt, Rubens, Renoir, Degas, Chagall and Modigliani amongst many others.  Av. Del Libertador 1473, Recoleta. 5288-9900 .

Museum opening hours
Tuesday to Friday: 12.30 – 8.30 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday: 9.30 a.m. – 8.30 p.m.
Monday closed

Museo de Arte Latino Americano de Buenos Aires (MALBA): The MALBA is set in a modern building and showcases an impressive collection of Latin-American art from the twentieth century. The museum, which has become one of the most popular cultural centers in the city, offers a unique collection of sculptures, drawings, paintings, collage, photographs and objects by artists from Central and South America. The museum also hosts film screenings and interesting exhibitions and conferences and has a highly recommendable restaurant.  Avenida Figueroa Alcorta 3415, Recoleta. 4808-6500.

Museum opening hours
From Thursday to Monday: 12.00 am to 8.00 pm
Wednesdays: 12.00- 9.00 pm

Museo de Arte Moderno de Buenos Aires (MAMBA):  Lovers of modern art are now welcome to visit the recently re-inaugurated MAMBA. The museum, located in the neighborhood of San Telmo, is made up of two exhibition halls with two different collections. “Narrativas Inciertas” is an assembly of pieces by contemporary and up-and-coming local artists. Whilst “El imaginario de Ignacio Pirovano” displays a donated collection which includes both local and international modern art. Av. San Juan 350, San Telmo. 4342-3001/2970.

Museum opening hours
Monday to Friday from 12.00am to 7.00pm

Saturdays and Sundays from 11.00am to 8.00pm.

Museo Nacional de Arte Decorativo (MNAD): The Decorative Art Museum is a palace from the beginning of the 20th century. Designed by French architect René Sergent in 1911 and built with European materials it is a great example of French architecture in Buenos Aires. Its marvelous collection of European and Oriental paintings and sculptures, the great hall and the impressive staircase make this place well worth a visit.  Av.del Libertador 1902, Recoleta.  4801-8248

Museum opening hours:
Tuesdays to Sundays from 2.00pm to 7.00pm
Mondays closed

Guided tours in English are available every day at 2pm

Museo de Arte Hispanoamericano Isaac Fernandez Blanco: Set in the neo-colonial Palacio Noel, the focus of this museum is Hispanic-American art. An impressive display of antique and religious objects, furniture, silver, and paintings dating back to the 1700´s depict a key historic moment where two very different cultures collided to define what South America is today. The museum also hosts concerts, special exhibits and other cultural events. Suipacha 1422, Downtown. 4327.0272.

Museum opening hours:

Tuesday to Friday from 2pm-6pm

Saturday and Sunday from 12am-6pm.

English tours must be booked in advance.

Museo de Arte Español Enrique Larreta: This Spanish Art Museum, decorated as a Spanish renaissance palace and surrounded by a unique Spanish Muslim garden, was the home of author Enrique Larreta. His extensive collection of sculptures, paintings and furniture mostly from the Renaissance and Baroque periods can be appreciated in this ornamented historical landmark. Juramento 2291, Belgrano, 4784-4040.

Museum Opening Hours:

Monday to Friday  from 1pm-7pm

Saturday from 10am-8pm

Museo de Arte Popular Jose Hernández: Popular art and local artisans work are displayed in this museums, where you will find ceramics, baskets, knits, instruments and other handmade traditional objects made from local materials. Av. Libertador 2373, Recoleta. 4803-2384

Museum opening hours:

Wednesday to Friday from 1pm-7pm,

Saturday and Sunday from 10am-8pm

Museo de Esculturas Luis Perlotti: Luis Perlotti was a distinguished Argentine sculptor who dealt with native themes and indigenous imagery, as well as producing sculptures and monuments of local characters of the artistic and political scene.  In 1969 he donated his house and workshop in Caballito for its use as a museum. The museum showcases an ample selection of his works as well as displaying sculptures by other renowned Argentine artists. Additionally the museum showcases the late sculptors collections of native textiles and archeological objects acquired on his journeys through Argentina, Bolivia and Peru. Pujol 644, Caballito. 4433-3396.

Museum opening hours

Tuesday to Sunday from 11am-7pm

Museo de Artes Plasticas Eduardo Sivory: Ideally located next to the Palermo rose gardens this intimate museum showcases a collection of Argentine art from the twentieth century. Temporary exhibits are also held in this museum which aspires to promote the local artists and industry. Av. Infanta Isabel 555, Palermo. 4774-9452

Museum opening hours:

Tuesday to Friday from midday-8pm

Saturdays and Sundays from 10am-8pm

Museo de Bellas Artes Benito Quinquela Martín: An impressive collection of Argentine art can be appreciated in this museum set in the heart of La Boca, where its famous resident artist Quinquela Martín donated much of his work in support of the local art industry, and of the education of children through art. Av. Pedro de Mendoza 1835, La Boca. 4301-1080.

Museum opening hours:

Tuesday to Sunday from 10.30am-5.30pm

Museo de Xul Solar: This lovely intimate art museum exhibits artists Xul Solar´s  colorful metaphysical dreamlike paintings, and also some of his nutty but brilliant inventions, such as a new global language, and the Panjuego, a game which he made up and played with many of his friends including Borges whose books he sometimes illustrated. Laprida 1212, Palermo. 4824-3302.

Museum opening hours:

Monday to Friday from midday- 8pm.

Saturday from midday to 7pm.

The Argentine Gaucho

(Photo by tim ellis)

The gaucho is one of the few local characters which the national culture has adopted as truly Argentine. Allthough the origins of these nomadic cattle herders is ambiguous it is generally accepted that they appeared after colonization as the offspring of Natives with Europeans. A few things characterized this new generation of locals; one was their skill riding horses and handling cattle, another was their nomadic nature. They were also proficient with knives, boleadoras and guitars and many of them were payadores, which means they recited poetic stories about their lives to the strum of the guitar. It is the gauchesque payadas that led to the posterior gauchesque literature that was key to transforming the Gaucho into an emblematic national character.

The image of the gaucho was not always positive. For a long time they were considered to be outlaws and rebels, and as social castaways they were readily sent to fight the civil wars. Once the wars were over, there was no place in society for gauchos, so they were culturally resignified. The parallel influx of immigrants to the city had created a need for a national identity, and for the countryside to become appealing as it was the land that needed to be populated. Amidst this context, gauchesque literature, which portrayed the life, tradition and used the language of the gauchos, found its perfect place. From then on, through the local literature of emblematic authors such as José Hernandez who wrote the famous Martín Fierro, Leopoldo Lugones who wrote La Guerra Gaucha and  Ricardo Güiraldes, who wrote Don Segundo Sombra, amongst others, the gaucho acquired a mythical place in society.

Popular literary adaptations to film were also made from gauchesque novels, completing the insertion of this rustic character into the Argentine culture. Some noticeable examples are Juan Moreira adapted to film by Leonardo Fabio, Los Hijos de Fierro, which makes a parallelism between Peron and Martin Fierro, by Pino Solanas and Don Facundo Sombra adapted to film by Manuel Antín.

We Recommend: Isla Martín García

(Photo by Ostrosky Photos)

Between Argentina and Uruguay, in the middle of the Rio de la Plata is a scantly populated island called Martín García, one of Buenos Aires´ natural reserves and historical landmarks.

The island, which was discovered by the expedition of Juan Díaz de Solís in 1516 was initially used as a prison 1765 until 1886 since it was very difficult to escape from due to the turbulent waters around it. Later on it was also used as a political prison and military garrison and some of the country’s most important and controversial political figures such as Marcelo Alvear,  Hipolito Yrigoyen, Juan Domingo Peron and Arturo Frondizi  served time there.

Now a days the island functions as a tourist destination and ecological reserve with over 800 species of plants, and more than 250 species of birds. Historical sites include a museum, a lighthouse, the prisons and a cemetery amongst others. The island is also famous for its Panettone.

 

How to get there

There are only two ways to get to the island, one is by a light aircraft which takes approximately 20 minutes from the city, and the other is by the Cacciola boat company in Tigre which offers day trip excursions including snacks and lunch and also overnight excursions with lodging at the only hostel in the Island.  Aircraft information here. La Cacciola here.