This Week: 3rd to 9th of August

Monday

graffiti

(Photo by Ignacio Sanz)

Fierro Hotel is kicking off the month with a renovated façade that showcases the work of talented local street artists. Want to see more? The unexpectedly warm winter weather is perfect for strolling the city streets on one of Graffitimundo’s tours which will show you the who is who and the whereabouts of Argentine street art.  More information here.

In the afternoon, from 5.30pm to 7.30pm, you can stop by the Fierro Hotel garden and grab a couple of cocktails at the new UCO after office event! 3220-6800. Soler 5862, Palermo.

You can also head to the Centro Cultural Konex where famous percussion group, La Bomba del Tiempo, will be carrying out their Monday show starting at 7pm. Sarmiento 3151, Almagro.

For some great post-dancing fugazzeta pizza, go to the nearby Los Cocos. Av Córdoba 3303, Almagro

Tuesday

mate

(Photo by Sam Verhaert)

The new exhibit at the MNBA (Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes) features indigenous art from Paraguay. Av. del Libertador 1473, Recoleta.

And while on the topic of Paraguay, practice Spanish and try some mate, a typical drink inherited from the Guaraní culture, at the Tuesday Mate Conversation Club that starts at 6.30pm. Sign up at mateclubdeconversacion@gmail.com . Uruguay 862, downtown.

Wednesday

música

(Photo by Carolina Bello)

If you’re in the San Telmo area, stop by the Ethnographic museum and learn more about the Argentine indigenous community. Moreno 350, San Telmo.

Later on, stop by the Centro Cultural Recoleta and catch one of the stunning Fuerza Bruta shows. Tickets here. 

Thursday

The Museo de Arte Hispanoaméricano Isaac Fernandez Blanco, located in the stunning Palacio Noel, is featuring a special retrospective of Ecuadorian photographer Hugo Cifuentes.  Suipacha 1422, downtown.

In the evening, the first performance of Antidiaspora, featuring music by Argentine musicians developed in France, will be taking place at the Colón Theatre. Functions will be taking place on the 6th, 7th and 8th of August. Tickets here.

Friday

helado

(Photo by Filipe Fortes)

Expect Summery warm weather on Friday and make sure to stop by one of our recommended spots for ice-cream after spending the day outdoors!

In the evening, the first performance of Antidiaspora, featuring music by Argentine musicians developed in France, will be taking place at the Colón Theatre. Functions will be taking place on the 6th, 7th and 8th of August. Tickets here.

Saturday and Sunday

las nereidas

(Photo by Ignacio Sanz)

Book your place at UCO´s unique weekend brunch, now revamped with an Irish version as well! 3220-6800Soler 5862, Palermo.

For an off the beaten path outing, check out the Caballito neighborhood and stop by Parque Rivadavia where the Buenos Aires Market gourmet food fair will be taking place throughout the weekend. Av. Rivadavia 4800, Caballito.

Head to the Ecological Reserve behind Puerto Madero and look for the stunning monument La Fuente de las Nereidas which depicts the birth of Venus, and was sculpted by Lola Mora, one of Argentina’s most renowned women artists.

You can also stop by the Palermo Rosedal where you can rent paddle boats to cruise the small lake alongside the ducks, and visit the Sivori Museum, which offers free tours in English and German on Saturdays at 3pm and 5pm! Av. Infanta Isabel 555, Palermo.

The Legend of the Ceibo Tree

(Photo by Karen Blix)

The Ceibo is both the national tree and flower of Argentina. It is very resistant to both ice and fire and it has inspired tangos, poetry and folklore music as a symbol of courage and strength in the face of adversity.

According to legend, there was once an indigenous woman named Anahí who lived on the shores of the Paraná River. She was small and unsightly, however, her looks were forgotten on summer nights when she came to sing with her beautiful voice to her tribe about their gods and the love of their land.

When the conquistadors came to conquer the land, they took Anahí and others from her tribe as prisoners. One night, the guard of her cell fell asleep and Anahí saw a chance of escaping. The guard, however, woke up just as she was getting away and so she stabbed him. His dying holler startled the rest of the soldiers and Anahí was unable to escape. Her punishment for killing the man was to burn at the stake.

On the night of her sentence, she was tied to a tree and a fire was lit. The flames quickly caught on and the indigenous woman began to sing to her land and her nature.

The following morning, the soldiers stood astounded at the spot of her death. In place of the ashes they had expected to find, there was a blooming Ceibo tree showing off its splendorous red flowers.

Argentine Aborigines

(Photo by canosadaniel1)

Argentine cultural identity is a mix of many influences stemming from the encounter of local aborigines with Europeans since the Colonization of America, and after the many migratory currents that the country underwent.

In Buenos Aires, the presence of European influences is more than evident: French architecture, Italian and Spanish food, language and gesticulation, and so on. The indigenous influence in the capital however is less apparent, although in many other provinces local tribes are still a significant part of society.

The Argentine aboriginal map is divided into three main regions: the Andean Northwest, which at a time was an outpost of the Inca Empire and the indigenous culture still thrives today; the Northeast, where some tribes, like the Wichis still exist today, related to the Tupí and Guaraní peoples, and finally the Pampa and Patagonia regions, populated by mainly nomadic tribes that are mostly extinct.

Within each of these regions and large generalized groups of indigenes there are many tribes, each with their own cultural characteristics, many which make up a part of the local identity today. Mate drinking for example, is a ritual that comes from the Guaraní who planted the mate herb over the burial ground of their loved ones and then shared the beverage made from the leaves to keep the spirit of their people alive.

International Artisans Fair

(Photo by JOSE-MARIA MORENO GARCIA = FOTOGRAFO HUMANISTA)

The annual international artisans fair is taking place at La Rural in Palermo until the 9th of December, and it is a great opportunity to purchase beautifully crafted objects, art and decorations and to watch the talented artisans at work.

The fair exhibits traditional, regional, artisanal pieces from Latin America and around the world, and more contemporary displays. It is divided into sections offering pottery, basketwork, knives, leather goods, clothes, musical instruments, jewelry, games, woodwork, pieces crafted in metals, paper, knits, textiles, glass and more. Additionally, there are specially selected pieces that are awarded for their craftsmanship.

If you´re looking for a unique silver encrusted mate to take home, marvel at the meticulous weavers, or think a charango would make a great Christmas present, then a visit to this fair is a must. Tickets cost 26 pesos and opening hours are from 3pm to 10pm.  Av. Sarmiento 2704, Palermo.

Mate: A Community Tradition

(Photo by Evelyn Proimos)

A bitter beverage brewed from the leaves of the Yerba Mate has been circulating Paraguay, Argentina and Uruguay from before the Colonization. Drinking mate has become a  kept tradition of the Guarani Indians, carried out in a ritual and collective form.
Popular belief states that the Guaranies planted Yerba Mate on the burial sites of their loved ones. As the plant grew, they collected the leaves and brewed mate with it which they shared in a round with their families. It was their belief that the spirit of their deceased would grow with the plant and seep through the beverage into their own bodies.  Many other legends exist around this infusion drank from a calabash gourd through a metal straw, but despite diferent versions it has allways been a tradition valuing the preservation of the culture and sharing amongst the community.

Throughout the colonization, the many cultural and social changes, and the large waves of immigration that the country has gone through, this custom has remained and has been adopted to a larger or lesser degree by all, having become a symbol of local identity and really keeping a piece of the Guarani alive.  The mate culture has many peculiarities, such as considering the first fresh mate to be the “fools mate” because it is still too bitter.   The custom of sharing mate in a round has also been kept and has made this drink more than just an antioxidant packed infusion. Rather, it is a tradition which brings people together to share a beautiful and ancient ritual that comes from the land.

Would you like to know how to brew your own mate? Click here.