This Week in Buenos Aires

Monday

 

(Photo by dandeluca)

Purchase an online PDF of Buenos Aires Domes (U.S $3.99) from Endless Mile and go on a dome hunt to discover these local architectural landmarks and the city while you’re at it!

In the evening don’t miss out on La Bomba del Tiempo, a percussion orchestra that has become one of the local absolute musts. Centro Cultural Konex, Sarmiento 3131, Abasto, 4864-3200.

For some great post dancing pizza, head to nearby Los Cocos and order a fugazetta pizza, an onion and mozzarella local specialty. Av. Córdoba 3303, Almagro, 4963-0457.

Tuesday

 

(Photo by Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires)

If you’re in the Recoleta area, visiting the cemetery or the MALBA, stop by the Centro Cultural Recoleta where x200mas, an art exhibit of predictions for the next 200 years, is being showcased. Junin 1930, Recoleta. 4803-1040

The impressive Colón Theatre will be staging the famous Le Corsair ballet, interpreted by the American Ballet Theatre starting at 8.30pm. Cerrito 628, Downtown. 4378 7100

Wednesday

 

(Photo by cyph3r)

La Manzana de las Luces is a block of historical buildings that housed the first public school, university and library. On this block is the San Ignacio church, the oldest in Buenos Aires. A mysterious set of tunnels, dating back to the 1700’s is another of this landmarks attractions that can be toured starting 3pm. Perú 272, San Telmo.

Later on head to hip bar Le Bar for great drinks and live music by Ven Fresca. Tucuman 422, Downtown. 5219-0858

Thursday

(Photo by Gerard Stolk)

The Lunfardo and Tango book fair in San Telmo, offers a variety of tango paraphernalia, readings and shows. The fair will be held until the 30th of December from 3pm-9pm at the Academia Porteña del Lunfardo and is the perfect chance to get to know this interesting aspect of the local culture better. Estados Unidos 1379, San Telmo. 4383.2393

Book your place for the Fierro Hotel’s Thursday wine tasting and sample some great Argentine wines, chosen by the president of the Argentine Sommelier Association Andres Rosberg and in-house Sommelier Martin Bruno. Tastings cost 25 USD per person and are limited to 7 people. Soler 5862, Palermo. 3220-6800.

Friday

(Photo by lauromaia)

Spend some time browsing books and sitting down for a read over coffee at the stunning Ateneo Grand Splendid. The impressive bookstore is considered to be one of the most beautiful in the world. Av. Santa Fe 1860. 4813.6052

Later on head to Doppelganger Bar in San Telmo for some of the city’s best drinks and atmosphere and some pre New Year fun! Juan de Garay 500, San Telmo, 4300 0201

Saturday and Sunday

 

(Photo by N i c o _)

Book your place at one of the city restaurants for a memorable New Year Eve dinner. Some suggestions are HG Restaurant at the Fierro Hotel, which will be serving a special tasting menu, or the traditional Confiteria La Ideal, which will be offering a special tango show with dinner, a midnight toast and dancing.

On the 31st the stunning Palacio Barolo will be offering a nocturnal tour finishing at their lighthouse for a midnight toast under the light of fireworks. Av de Mayo 1370 9° P. Esc. 249/52. (54-11) 4381-1885. info@palaciobarolotours.com.ar

This Week in Buenos Aires

Monday

(Photo by blmurch)

Head to the botanical gardens in Palermo and stop by ex-pat Beatrice Murch’s exhibit on the local Rosewood  trees, which decorate the city and have become a part of its character. Santa Fe 3951, Palermo. 4381-4527

Start the weeknight with an evening of tango at Salon Canning, which is open until 5am and stages  live tango bands as well as tango lessons and dancing. Scalabrini Ortiz 1331, Palermo. 4826-8351

 

Tuesday

(Photo by Juanele AR)

Take  a San Telmo art walk with Juanele starting 3pm at Balcarce 1150 , San Telmo. Book in advance here.

The legendary front man of The Byrds, Roger McGuinn will be playing at the Teatro Coliseo at 9pm.  Tickets here.

In the evening head to Magdalena’s Party for happy hour drinks from 8-midnight and continue on with them to Hype nightclub for some proper porteño style partying.  Thames 1795, Palermo. 833-9127

 

Wednesday

(Photo by buen-rumbo)

The Lunfardo and Tango book fair  in San Telmo, offers a variety of tango paraphernalia, readings and shows. The fair will be held until the 30th of December from 3pm-9pm at the Academia Porteña del Lunfardo and is the perfect chance to get to know this interesting aspect of the local culture better.  Estados Unidos 1379, San Telmo. 4383.2393

In the evening head to Gibraltar, a popular English pub in the San Telmo area. Great draught beer, delicious curries, and a friendly laid back atmosphere make Gibraltar a great place to begin or end the night! Peru 895, San Telmo 4632-5310 Opening Hours: 6pm-4am

 

Thursday

(Photo by vmiramontes)

A special photography exhibit is being showcased at the historic Espacio Virrey Liniers featuring old photographs of the city and daguerreotypes. 2pm-7pm.  Venezuela 469, San Telmo.

Book your place for the Fierro Hotel’s Thursday wine tasting and sample some great Argentine wines, chosen by the president of the Argentine Sommelier Association Andres Rosberg and in-house Sommelier Martin Bruno.  Tastings cost 25 USD per person and are limited to 7 people. Soler 5862, Palermo. 3220-6800.

 

Friday

(Photo by iggykaser)

With Christmas just around the corner, why not head to the eccentric Dorrego Flea Market in Palermo to browse and shop for original presents at bargain prices? Av.Dorrego and Conde, Palermo. Tue-Sun 10am-7pm

In the evening head to Notorious for the Friday night jazz jam and drinks. Callao 966, Palermo. 4813-6888

 

Saturday and Sunday

(Photo by roberta zouain)

Take a day trip to Tigre, a town in the outskirts of the city set on an island lined by small rivers and streams. The rugged location surrounded by nature offers a variety of attractions including canoeing, kayak and other excursions by boat, trekking, ecotourism, motorboat and commuter boats to take you to different places on the riverside, restaurants, spas, tea-houses, picnic sites, a naval museum, an art museum, a mate museum, a casino, a crafts fair and an amusement park. More information here.

Don’t miss percusion orchestra La Bomba del Tiempo´s end of the year party on Saturday starting at midnight. Sarmiento 3131, Almagro.

Lunfardo and Tango Book Fair 2011

(Photo by buen-rumbo)

The relationship between tango and lunfardo, a local dialect,  is extensive and characteristic of the local identity.  Initially Lunfardo was only spoken by criminals who incorporated Italian, Cocoliche (a mix of Spanish and Italian), Gaucho dialect, Aboriginal words, French and Portuguese into their new slang. As lunfardo spread to the lower classes, it was incorporated to tango lyrics and from there introduced into the Spanish spoken by everyone.

The Lunfardo and Tango book fair  in San Telmo, offers a variety of tango paraphernalia, readings and shows. The fair will be held until the 30th of December from 3pm-9pm at the Academia Porteña del Lunfardo and is the perfect chance to get to know this interesting aspect of the local culture better.  Estados Unidos 1379, San Telmo. 4383.2393

 

Our pick of recommended activities are:

 

Friday 9:

-Tango in San Telmo with Olga Reni at 6pm.

-Conference about the traditional cafe that had the most tango influence and activity. (in Spanish) 7pm.

 

Saturday 10:

-Performance by  Vocal Ecléctico.

-Las Perlas del Tango presents Estela Bonnet, Sandra Chebriau, Silvana Reyes, Silvia Nieves, and guest poet Nélida Puig. 7.30pm

 

Friday 16:

– Concert by Buenos Aires Tango

-Tango y Dance exhibit with Antonio and Graciela. 6pm.

-Concert of tango singers at 8pm.

 

Sunday 18

-Pepe Otero presents Tango and poetry, tangos form the 40´s and more. 7.30pm.

 

Friday 23:

-Tango show by Sandrina Gallego Poetaria. 7pm.

 

Monday 26:

-Screening of Café de los maestros. 4pm.

-Documentary about Cafe Tortoni. 7pm.

 

Friday 30:

– Las Perlas del Tango closes the event with a parade starting at 6pm.

This Week in Buenos Aires

Monday

(Photo by Aracelota)

The Lunfardo and Tango bookfair kicked off yesterday in San Telmo, offering a variety of tango paraphernalia, readings and shows. The fair will be held until the 30th of December from 3pm-9pm at the Academia Porteña del Lunfardo.  Estados Unidos 1379, San Telmo. 4383.2393

In the evening head to Boris Club de Jazz  for a guitar concert by Alvarado starting at 10pm. Gorriti 5568, Palermo. 4777-0012.

 

Tuesday

(Photo by VeronikaB)

For an off the beaten path activity, don’t miss Fueguia in Palermo, a scent lab where you can sniff out nature, or aromatic blends reminiscent of writers such as Borges. Cabello 3791, 2 J, Palermo. 4806-5619.

In the evening starting at 7pm you can explore the city’s art galleries and museums at the last Gallery Night of the year.

If you’re looking for a laugh don’t miss the Grin Go! Stand Up comedy Show starting at 9pm at the Absinth Resto Bar. Bartolomé Mitre 1695, Downtown. 4371-6486

 

Wednesday

(Photo by Colombia Travel)

The International Artisan Fair is being held this week at La Rural and is a great chance to see and purchase local and international artisan designs whilst getting to watch the artisans at work. Open 3-10pm daily, until 11th December. Av. Sarmiento 2704, Palermo.

In the evening catch one of the circus shows being put on at Campus Polo Circo starting 7pm. Av. Juan de Garay and Combate de los Pozos, Parque Patricios.

 

Thursday

(Photo by scrambldmeggs)

Head to the Japanese gardens in Palermo and visit the annual exhibit of Japanese paintings. Figueroa Alcorta and Av. Casares.

Book your place for the Fierro Hotel’s Thursday wine tasting and sample some great Argentine wines, chosen by the president of the Argentine Sommelier Association Andres Rosberg and in-house Sommelier Martin Bruno.  Tastings cost 25 USD per person and are limited to 7 people. Soler 5862, Palermo. 3220-6800.

 

Friday

(Photo by Argentina Polo Day)

Book you place with Argentina Polo day and spend the day out in the outskirts of the city exploring the world of polo. The day includes a wine tasting with ‘empanadas’, horseback riding, a Polo Match, polo lessons , the opportunity to talk to coaches and professional players, a typical asado,  and leisure time by the swimming pool. More information here.

 

Saturday and Sunday

(Photo by b00nj)

Argentines cross over to Uruguay frequently for weekend getaways to lovely towns and summer holidays at the beach. One of the common destinations for a weekend away is Colonia del Sacramento, a historic town founded in 1680 with a combination of Portuguese, Spanish colonial and Post-Colonial styles. Take a ferry to this unique town for a short rest from the busy city.  Ferry rides available form Buquebus and Colonia Express.

Our 7 Links

(Los Siete by Eduardo Amorim)

We recently got nominated by Jeff from Lengthy Travel Blog (which has some excellent tips for travelers) to participate in the 7 Links projects. The project which is being organized by Tripbase consists in linking 7 of your  own posts which meet previously specified criteria and then nominating other bloggers to do the same so that an exchange and circulation of information takes place.  We though it was a fun idea and also a great way to revisit some of the tips we have posted in the past.

 

Our 7 links are:

 

1-Most Beautiful Post:  10 Things We Love About Buenos Aires

2-Most Popular Post: 10 Things to do in Buenos Aires Off the Beaten Path

3-Most Controversial: Vegetarian Buenos Aires

4-Most Helpful: How to Make a Typical Argentine Asado

5-Most Successful: We Recommend: Cooking Classes in Buenos Aires

6-Didn’t Get the Attention it Deserved:  Lunfardo: A Slang from the Prisons and Tango

7-Proud of: 5 Best Hotels for Food and Drink

 

And our nominees are:

Eat like a girl: Wonderful food and travel blog, including special recipies!

The Lost Asian in Buenos Aires : Great reviews of Buenos Aires food and restaurants!

Juanele AR- Art in Buenos Aires: A wonderful art blog and the best art tours in the city!

The Real Argentina: Travel tips, reviews, suggestions and anything else you need to know!

South American Travel News: A useful resource for those of you planning your trip!

Lunfardo: A Slang from the Prisons and Tango

A lot of you may have noticed that Argentines don´t speak Spanish the same way most other Spanish speakers from other Spanish speaking countries do.
Differences in pronunciation of “y” and “ll” and  the use of “vos” instead of “tu” amongst others, constitute the main difference on an auditive level. However,  the incorporation of “lunfardo”, a jargon that originated in the prisons of Buenos Aires as a way of secret communication amongst prisoners  is what makes the local Spanish unique.
Initially Lunfardo was only spoken by criminals who incorporated Italian, Cocoliche (a mix of Spanish and Italian), Gaucho dialect, Aboriginal words, French and Portuguese into their new slang. They also reversed syllables so that for example cafe became feca, and tango became gotan. As lunfardo spread to the lower classes, it was incorporated to tango lyrics and hence introduced into the Spanish spoken by everyone.
Now a days, we still use many of these lunfardo terms, such as feca, which we invite you to order the next time you´re at a café.

Here is a small list of amusing terms which are still used and you can try out if you want. If you’re looking for a Lunfardo/English dictionary, try the Corrientes bookstores, there used to be one called “Mataburro – Lunfardo/English” by Sara Melul and Roberto Cruañas.

Afanar: (A fah nahr) is to steal and an afano is a rip off. “Me afanaron la billetera” (My wallet was stolen)  “Esa campera es un afano” (That jacket is a rip off).
Atorrante: (Ah toh ran teh) Good-for-nothing. Scoundrel.  It can be used for example to shout out the window at a bad driver. Also to affectionately call a child: “Vení acá atorrante” (come over here you little scoundrel.) It is said, but not confirmed,  that the word originates from a brand of the citiy’s water drainage pipes (A.Torrant) where the bums used to gather.

Boludo/a:  (Boh loo doh/dah) One of the most commonly used words by locals which means idiot but literally translates to someone with big testicles (even though it’s used for girls and women too!). It can be an insult “sos un boludo” (you are an asshole)  or just a way of calling each other “che boluda, ¿adonde vamos?” (hey girl, where you should we go?). A Boludez, is something easy, a piece of cake. “hablar lunfardo es una boludez” (speaking lunfardo is a piece of cake).

Guita: (Ghee tah) It means money. “¿Me prestas algo de guita?” (can I borrow some money?). It is believed to have been an existing word in gypsy slang and spanish prison slang.

Morfi/Morfar: (Mohr fee/ mohr faar) Morfi is food and morfar is to eat, very informal. “¿Che, Vamos a morfar?” (Hey, should we go grab a bite?) The origins of these terms is the argot french word morfer which means to ingest food.

Pibe: (Pee beh) Used in lunfardo to refer to a boy, or a male. “¿Ya vino el pibe del delivery?” (Did the delivery boy come?).  Its origins are disputed, some say it comes from an italian word meaning aprentice, others say it comes from a catalan word meaning aromatic where the word  was taken to describe bad smelling youth.

Pilcha: (Peel chah) Refers to the traditional gaucho attire and commonly used to speak of all clothes. Empilchado is a way of saying dressed to the nines. The word originally comes from an aboriginal language in which it means wrinkle.  Use it in a store where you like the clothes “¡Que linda pilcha!” (What nice clothes!).