This Week: 22nd- 28th of June 2015

Monday

antorcha

(Photo by Beatrice Murch)

If you’re planning to visit the city center to see the Obelisco, stop by the Palacio de Aguas Corrientes (palace of running waters) on Cordoba Avenue and Riobamba. The stunning building is now Aguas Argentinas´ (the local water company headquarters) and is also a museum. Open from 9am-1pm. Riobamba 750 – 1° Piso.  6319-1104.

In the afternoon, from 5.30pm to 7.30pm you can stop by the Fierro Hotel garden and grab a couple of cocktails at the new UCO after office event! 3220-6800. Soler 5862, Palermo.

You can also stop by Centro Cultural Konex where famous percussion group, La Bomba del Tiempo, will be carrying out their Monday show starting at 7pm. Sarmiento 3151, Almagro.

Tuesday

matestrellado

(Photo by Manu Galindo)

Take one of Foto Ruta’s Street Scape tours and learn some photography tips while discovering the city from a different angle. More information here.

Try some mate, practice some Spanish and meet new people at the Tuesday Mate Conversation Club that starts at 6.30pm. Sign up at mateclubdeconversacion@gmail.com . Uruguay 862, downtown.

Wednesday

Stop by the Casa del Bicentenario to check out the new exhibit, Legado Vivo, which showcases elements from Wichi and Maori cultures. Riobamba 985, downtown

Later on, at 10pm in the Abasto Neighborhood, the contemporary tango group Orquesta Típica Fernandez Fierro will be staging a live show. Sánchez de Bustamante 764, Abasto.

Thursday

lucharemos

(Lucharemos hasta borrar la ley- Sebastián Diaz Morales)

The MALBA will be inaugurating two new exhibits, one of renowned Argentine artist Rogelio Poleccelo, and the other of a collection of video art by different artists that depict controversial historical events. Av. Figueroa Alcorta 3415, Palermo.

At 8pm, the Buenos Aires Philharmonic Orchestra will be presenting clarinet pieces by John Corigliano and Antonin Dvorak at the Colón Theatre. Tickets here.

Friday

higuaín

(Photo by Articularnos.com)

Head to the new Centro Cultural Kirchner, which used to be the post office headquarters, and check out the exhibits on mail art and Sophie Calle. At 5pm, there will also be a performance by Fernando Rubio called Todo lo que está a mi lado. Sarmiento 151, downtown.

At 8.30pm, experience the Argentine football sentiment at one of the city bars with TV screens where you can drink beer, nibble on empanadas and watch the Copa America football match against Colombia with the locals.

Saturday and Sunday

rosdal

(Photo by Nathali López)

Book your place at UCO´s unique weekend brunch, now revamped with an Irish version as well! 3220-6800Soler 5862,Palermo.

Throughout June, every Saturday at 10pm, renowned Argentine folklore and jazz artist, Luis Salinas, will be playing a live show at Torcuato Tasso. Defensa 1575, San Telmo

On Saturday evening, the Colón Theatre will be staging a concert by the Budapest Festival Orchestra (tickets here), and on Sunday at 11 am, the Mendoza University Choir will be presenting a medeley of choral pieces (tickets are free- 2 per person-  and handed out on a first come first serve basis at the Theatre’s ticket office on Saturday)

Stop by the Palermo Rosedal where you can rent paddle boats to cruise the small lake alongside the ducks, and visit the Sivori Museum, which offers free tours in English and German on Saturdays at 3pm and 5pm! Av. Infanta Isabel 555, Palermo.

This Week: 6th-12th of April 2015

Monday

infinite

(Photo by azarius)

The BAFICI (Buenos Aires independent film festival) is coming up and tickets go on sale today, find the program here.

Check out the new MALBA exhibits featuring photographs by Annemarie Heinrich, and installations, choreographies and more under the name “Infinite Experience”. Av. Figueroa Alcorta 3415, Palermo.

In the afternoon, from 5.30pm to 7.30pm you can stop by the Fierro Hotel garden and grab a couple of cocktails at the new UCO after office event! 3220-6800. Soler 5862, Palermo.

You can also stop by Centro Cultural Konex where famous percussion group, La Bomba del Tiempo, will be carrying out their Monday show starting at 7pm. Sarmiento 3151, Almagro.

Tuesday

mate cósmico

(Photo by CB shoots)

Huellas de lo real (Imprints of Reality), is the new photography exhibit taking place at Parque de la Memoria, featuring the works of Juan Travnik and Jonathan Molner. Rafael Obligado 6745, Costanera.

Try some mate, practice some Spanish and meet new people at the Tuesday Mate Conversation Club that starts at 6.30pm. Sign up at mateclubdeconversacion@gmail.com . Uruguay 862, downtown.

Wednesday

palacio barolo

(Photo by Alberto Rodrigo Longo)

One of the city’s architectural landmarks is the famous Palacio Barolo, full of references to poet Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy and the quest for heaven. Guided tours take place from 4pm to 6pm and evening guided tours at 8.00pm include tasting of an awarded wine and a national delicacy. Av. de Mayo 1370, downtown.

Later on, immerse yourself in total darkness for a special experience of Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon. Tickets here.

Thursday

swing low

(Photo by ManuB.)

Check out the new Mona Hatoum exhibit being held at Fundación PROA until the 14th of June. Av. Pedro de Mendoza 1929, La Boca.

Later on at 8pm, catch the free Piazzolla tribute featuring ex-Megadeth guitarist Marty Friedman at the Usina del Arte. Tickets will be handed out from 5pm onwards. Agustín Caffarena 1, La Boca.

Friday

There’s plenty to see and do in the Recoleta area including a visit to the cemetery, to the fine arts museum (MNBA) which is featuring an exhibit of Nordic art, and at 7 pm, a free screening of Tarkovski’s The Sacrifice, at the Palais de Glace.

At 9pm, Jason Mraz will be staging a live show at the Gran Rex Theatre. Tickets here.

Saturday and Sunday

lens

(Photo by thevince)

Book your place at UCO´s unique weekend brunch, now revamped with an Irish version as well! 3220-6800Soler 5862, Palermo.

Check out the mysterious Foto Ruta Clue tours that take place on Saturdays, and hint your way through the city to discover it through a lens. More information here.

The Sivory Museum, next to the Palermo Rosedal offers free tours in English and German on Saturdays at 3pm and 5pm! Av. Infanta Isabel 555, Palermo.

On Saturday at 9pm, Jason Mraz will be staging a live show at the Gran Rex Theatre. Tickets here.

On Sunday, stop by the Feria de Mataderos to get a taste of typical local “campo” culture. Av de Los Corrales 6500, Mataderos.

Argentine Aborigines

(Photo by canosadaniel1)

Argentine cultural identity is a mix of many influences stemming from the encounter of local aborigines with Europeans since the Colonization of America, and after the many migratory currents that the country underwent.

In Buenos Aires, the presence of European influences is more than evident: French architecture, Italian and Spanish food, language and gesticulation, and so on. The indigenous influence in the capital however is less apparent, although in many other provinces local tribes are still a significant part of society.

The Argentine aboriginal map is divided into three main regions: the Andean Northwest, which at a time was an outpost of the Inca Empire and the indigenous culture still thrives today; the Northeast, where some tribes, like the Wichis still exist today, related to the Tupí and Guaraní peoples, and finally the Pampa and Patagonia regions, populated by mainly nomadic tribes that are mostly extinct.

Within each of these regions and large generalized groups of indigenes there are many tribes, each with their own cultural characteristics, many which make up a part of the local identity today. Mate drinking for example, is a ritual that comes from the Guaraní who planted the mate herb over the burial ground of their loved ones and then shared the beverage made from the leaves to keep the spirit of their people alive.

Typical Argentine Merienda

(Photo by amanky)

In Argentina we follow the Spanish-Italian tradition of the merienda, better known in the Anglo world as afternoon tea. It is basically a small meal between lunch and dinner. Although the culinary options nowadays have broadened and include treats such as muffins and bruschettas, classic Argentine meriendas consist of:

Cafe con leche and medialunas: A typical local staple served at all hours consisting of coffee with milk and yummy croissants made of lard (de grasa) or butter (de manteca).  In winter the coffee might be substituted by a submarino (a piece of chocolate dunked into hot milk).

Mate and facturas: Sugar and a caffeine like booster (mateine) come together in this combination of bitter mate and sweet pastries filled with dulce de leche, custard and quince jam.

Licuado de Banana and Tostado de jamón y queso: A favourite for Spring and Summer, this combination of banana and milk smoothie and grilled ham and cheese sandwich on special crustless bread, is a great afternoon energy booster.

Tea with milk and toast: The simplest version of the snacking combinations, and the one most commonly found in households. Toppings for toast are of course dulce de leche, maybe jam and for the light version cream cheese.

We Recommend: The Argentine Experience

(Photo by Dubber)

Foodies looking for a good time in Buenos Aires should definitely try The Argentine Experience; a meat packed event where Argentina’s culinary traditions are explored in a fun recreational atmosphere.

Options include a lunch experience and a dinner experience. Both begin with a mate refreshment upon arriving and then, once clad in chef hats and aprons, continue onto the empanada-making phase. After that comes a delicious steak and wine lunch, during which some fun and games are carried out, and then a mate tasting and brewing class, and an alfajor making class, all with top notch information about the local traditions. The dinner option also includes all you can drink until 11pm and free guest list entry to a BA nightclub.

The Lunch experience costs 60USD, and the dinner costs 75USD. Places must be booked in advance. More information here.

The Rules of Mate Brewing

(Photo by juanpol)

The world of mate is full of tradition and there are many details to keep in mind for this typical beverage to come out just right.

1. The preparation stage of the mate is crucial. To do so properly fill ¾ of the gourd with ‘yerba’ and then place the palm of your hand over the gourd and shake it. You should find some fine mate powder covering your palm. Once you have done this one or two times insert the mate straw on one of the sides of the gourd and don’t move it.

2. Rule of thumb: never brew a mate with boiling water. The water should be hot, between 85-95 C. If the water is boiling it will burn the yerba and destroy its flavor. Plus, if you’re around experienced mate drinkers they will never look at you the same again!

3. One of the most annoying things that happens when a mate isn’t well prepared is that the straw gets clogged. This usually happens when the dust isn’t shaken out (step 1) or when the straw is moved around once its been placed. The straw should be still, in the same place from start to finish.

 4. Another thing to avoid is blowing on the straw to cool it or unclog it. This is inconsiderate to others in the mate round and not very hygienic. The same goes for salivating the straw. Placing your dry lips on it should be enough to enjoy the beverage.

5. Finally, change the ‘yerba’ once its lost its taste , don’t insist on drinking a washed out mate, and never pass a washed out mate on to the next person unless you wish to insult them!

A few things to keep in mind:

The mate gourd must be cured before it can be used or it will tinge the mate with a foul taste. To do so wash it out well with hot water until the water is clear and free of pigments from the wood. Then fill the gourd with yerba up to the top and pour hot water on it. Leave it overnight and wash again well.

When sharing mates with others a few basics must be taken into account; the mate brewer, who must brew the mates for everyone in the round, must drink the first mate to make sure it’s ok, the mate should never be passed on once water has gotten cold and everyone’s turn must be respected.

Argentine Gifts

Christmas is all about giving, and traveling is a great opportunity to buy original gifts, be it for the festive season or for the sake of generosity. Below is our selection of top Argentine tokens to give away or take home as a souvenir.

Mate: Mate is a traditional bitter tea like beverage, which was originally taken by the Guarani Indian as a ritual. The yerba (dry mate leaves) is poured into a special gourd and then a metal straw is inserted. Hot water (but not boiling) is poured into the gourd and the beverage is sipped from the straw. The mate is then refilled with hot water and passed on to the next person, be it a friend or family member. This makes mate drinking a special community tradition and the preparation has many associated rituals to it. Additionally the beverage is full of antioxidants. Mate gourds, metal straws and other accessories can be readily found all around the city, and the perfect compliment to this gift is The Mate book.

(Photo by tditz_gb)

Facón: The facón is an elaborate gaucho fighting and utility knife that is carried in a leather sheath on a belt. Many are delicately carved with intricate silver designs and make beautiful decorations and gifts. To aquire silver facones head to Marcelo Toledo and Juan Carlos Pallarols in San Telmo, where other amazing silver objects can also be found.

(Photo by Eduardo Amorim)

Dulce de Leche and Alfajores: These are probably some of the most popular souvenirs people take back home after traveling to Argentina and there´s good reason for it. The famous caramel spread, and the sweet, cake like sandwiches with dulce de leche fillings are easy pleasers.

(Photo by bradlauster)

Wine: Argentina is famous for its top quality wine at friendly prices. Wine bars, and gourmet restaurants (including Fierro´s HG Restaurant) offer harder to find gems, and are well worth browsing.

(Photo by vmiramontes)

Tango Music:  A tango record is a great gift for music lovers and romantic spirits.  Other tango paraphernalia such as dancing shoes can also make a good present. To shop for tango music head to Zivals on Corrientes Avenue and in Palermo, or  buy  directly from their online tango store.

(Photo by totordenamur)

A San Telmo Antique: San Telmo is a world known antique center where valuable collectors items are sold, but also, where knick-knacks and unique objects from the immigrants that populated the country can be found.  Another place to look for antiques and unique finds is the Dorrego Flea Market in Palermo.

(Photo by lauromaia)

Buenos Aires Urban Art: Anyone who has been on the graffitimundo, or Juanele AR tours has had the chance to see that the local urban art is booming. Once a year, during the Christmas season, Palermo art gallery Hollywood in Cambodia  hosts a special sale of some of the best local stencils, graffitis, and illustrations by some of the most active Urban artists of the Buenos Aires scene.

(Photo by jimsnapper)