Buenos Aires: Where to Shop

Although some things may have gotten expensive in Buenos Aires as of late, others are still worth the purchase and this is especially true for those things unique to the place. We’re talking of dulce de leche of course, and alpargatas, but also of top range product by the local design talents, and vintage and antique goods. So, whether you’re on a thrift or splurge spree, here is a small guide to Buenos Aires: where to shop.

Top Design

editor

The local designer scene has been alive and kicking for many years now and we have Buenos Aires Fashion Week coming up this March to prove it. Designer Argentina isn’t only for clothes though, Fueguía offers designer scents at Casa Cavia in Palermo where you can also lunch, Monochrome offers designer bikes. So where are all these crafty goods?

The first place to look is the boutique lined Palermo streets. The neighborhood has long been the design epicenter of the city and it is where you will find top quality and also upcoming local design.

Another option is to explore the new Editor Market which is are recently opened designer department stores, one in Palermo and one on Corrientes Avenue, where everything including the coffee is designer something.

Finally, many designers offer their products in their private showrooms. Sophie Lloyd offers shopping tours in Buenos Aires and can probably guide you through this underground designer scene.

Antiques

antique

(photo by John (little time))

The city is also well known for its long standing antique markets, the most famous being the San Telmo Antique fair. Other places for antiques include the Dorrego Flea Market in Colegiales, and, in the outskirts of the city, the antique markets of the Barrancas and Maipu stations of the Tren de la Costa.

Local Goods

leather

(photo by JLS Photography – Alaska)

There are also many beautiful local goods including leather, silver, knits and woven goods by the local indigenas that are great purchasing options. Here is a great guide to shopping for leather, and if you’re looking for upscale silver then head to the Marcelo Toledo or Juan Carlos Pallarols stores in San Telmo. For a rustic campo market head to the Feria de Mataderos. For textiles and other indigenous designs check out http://www.arteetnicoargentino.com/.

Argentine Silver

(Photo by Eduardo Amorim)

“Argentina” derives from the Latin word “Argentum” which means silver.

The Pampa Indians already adorned their wives with silver bracelets way before the Spanish conquered America, who incorporated this ornamental precious metal into the construction of their churches and altars. With the colonization, the use of silver spread and was introduced into every day objects such as mates, silverware, gaucho knives and horse accessories becoming a definitive part of the national identity.

Now a days many talented local silversmiths carry on with this traditional craftsmanship.San Antonio de Areco, a town on the outskirts of Buenos Aires, has an important silverware production and a museum.  In Buenos Aires some of the most  renowned silversmiths are Marcelo Toledo , and Juan Carlos Pallarols , both in San Telmo.